The Gary Null Show

The Gary Null Show - 05.17.22

May 17, 2022

Blueberry diet linked to lower breast cancer risk: New Zealand study

Massey University (New Zealand), May 10, 2022

WELLINGTON (CIHAN)- Women might be able to reduce the risk of breast cancer by eating more blueberries, according to a New Zealand research.

A Massey University study in which blueberries were fed to animals as part of their diet found they had a 50-percent lower incidence rate of mammary tumors.

“Blueberries contain phytochemicals called anthocyanins, which may be responsible for the health benefits of blueberries,” Dr Janyawat Vuthijumnonk said in a statement.

Tumours found in animals that received blueberries with fibre included (in pomace form), were smaller and less aggressive than in animals without blueberry consumption or in animals that received just blueberry juice.

  “We also found circulating estrogen – the steroid hormone which plays a key role in breast cancer promotion – was lower in animals that consumed the blueberry pomace supplemented diet,” said Vuthijumnonk.

Study finds that yoga and meditation can help minimize cognitive impairment

UCLA, May 10, 2022

Inner peace and a flexible body may not be the most valuable benefits that yoga and meditation have to offer, suggests new research by a UCLA-led team of neuroscientists.

The team found that a three-month course of yoga and meditation practice helped minimize the cognitive and emotional problems that often precede Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia—and that it was even more effective than the memory enhancement exercises that have been considered the gold standard for managing mild cognitive impairment.

“Memory training was comparable to yoga with meditation in terms of improving memory, but yoga provided a broader benefit than memory training because it also helped with mood, anxiety and coping skills,” said Helen Lavretsky, the study’s senior author.

“Historically and anecdotally, yoga has been thought to be beneficial in aging well, but this is the scientific demonstration of that benefit,” said Harris Eyre, the study’s lead author. “We’re converting historical wisdom into the high level of evidence required for doctors to recommend therapy to their patients.”

The researchers report that the participants’ outward improvements in memory corresponded with perceptible changes in their brain activity. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, they showed that subjects in both groups had changes in their brain connectivity, but the changes among the yoga group were statistically significant, whereas the changes in the memory group were not.

Boost in nerve-growth protein helps explain why running supports brain health

New York University, May 16, 2022

Exercise increases levels of a chemical involved in brain cell growth, which bolsters the release of the “feel good” hormone dopamine, a new study shows. Dopamine is known to play a key role in movement, motivation, and learning.

Experts have long understood that regular running raises dopamine activity in the brain and may protect nerve cells from damage. In addition, past research has tied exercise-driven boosts in the dopamine-triggering chemical called brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and in dopamine levels to improvements in learning and memory. However, the precise way these three factors interact has until now remained unclear. 

Led by researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine, the investigation showed that mice running on a wheel for 30 days had a 40% increase in dopamine release in the dorsal stratium, the part of the brain involved in movement, compared to levels in mice that did not exercise. The runners also showed a nearly 60% increase in brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels compared to their non-running counterparts. Notably, the increase in dopamine release remained elevated even after a week of rest. Additionally, when BDNF levels were artificially reduced, running did not lead to additional dopamine release.

“Our findings suggest that BDNF plays a key role in the long-lasting changes that occur in the brain as a result of running,” says study lead author and neurobiologist Guendalina Bastioli, Ph.D. “Not only do these results help explain why exercise makes you move, think, and feel better, they also show that these benefits continue even if you do not work out every day,” adds Bastioli.

High levels of exercise linked to nine years of less aging at the cellular level

Brigham Young University, May 10, 2022

Despite their best efforts, no scientist has ever come close to stopping humans from aging. Even anti-aging creams can’t stop Old Father Time.

But new research from Brigham Young University reveals you may be able to slow one type of aging—the kind that happens inside your cells. As long as you’re willing to sweat.

The study, published in the medical journal Preventive Medicine, finds that people who have consistently high levels of physical activity have significantly longer telomeres than those who have sedentary lifestyles, as well as those who are moderately active.

Exercise science professor Larry Tucker found adults with high physical activity levels have telomeres with a biological aging advantage of nine years over those who are sedentary, and a seven-year advantage compared to those who are moderately active. To be highly active, women had to engage in 30 minutes of jogging per day (40 minutes for men), five days a week.

High fruit intake during adolescence linked with lower breast cancer risk

University of Oxford, May 11, 2022

A paper in The BMJ sheds new light on the relation of diet with breast cancer and heart disease. The study reports that high fruit consumption during adolescence may be associated with lower breast cancer risk.

A team of US researchers wanted to see whether fruit and vegetable consumption might affect subsequent breast cancer risk. They followed 90,000 nurses for over 20 years who reported their diet in early adulthood, of whom half also recalled their usual diet during adolescence.

They found that high fruit consumption during adolescence (2.9 v 0.5 servings per day) was associated with a roughly 25% lower risk of breast cancer diagnosed in middle age.

In particular, greater consumption of apple, banana and grapes during adolescence, as well as oranges and kale during early adulthood was significantly associated with a reduced breast cancer risk. 

Videos:

1. Jimmy Dore – Rachel Maddow’s Non-Stop COVID Lies
2. Zach Weissmueller – Forget the Great Reset. Embrace the Great Escape. (8:43) (Zach is From Reason TV)
3. Implanted Microchip, Klaus Schwab, World Economic Forum and The Great Reset (Voice Over 2:25)
4.  Douglas Kruger –  “You will OWN NOTHING, and you will be HAPPY” (start @ 0:47) (interview with Douglas Kruger conducted by David Ansara of The Centre For Risk Analysis (CRA)  

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