The Gary Null Show
The Gary Null Show - 06.28.22

The Gary Null Show - 06.28.22

June 28, 2022

Article:

How the organized Left got Covid wrong, learned to love lockdowns and lost its mind: an autopsy

https://thegrayzone.com/2022/03/31/left-covid-lockdowns-mind-autopsy/

 

EU Renews Digital COVID Pass Despite 99% Negative Public Feedback

https://www.zerohedge.com/geopolitical/eu-renews-digital-covid-pass-despite-99-negative-public-feedback

 

Videos:

1. Psywars Documentary. – The Obama Clip (0:23)

2. Clare Daly her best speech so far . Ukraine (1:22)

3. Vitamin Authentication. Electronic pill that stays in your body & will become a 18bit Battery operated chip (1:00)

4. Is Klaus Schwab the Most Dangerous Man in the World? (15:07)
 5. Kim Iversen: Inside The SECRET Bilderberg Meetings Between Spies, War Hawks And World Leaders (9:28)

6.  The great recycling LIE (what really happens to plastic) (10:44)
7.  New Rule: How the Left Was Lost | Real Time (HBO)  (8:30)

HEALTH NEWS

  • Grape consumption may offer benefits for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis
  • Bad habits that lead to cancer, chronic disease corrected by simple lifestyle intervention
  • The blueberry component pterostilbene has potent anti-myeloma activity
  • Exercise makes the blood of obese people healthier
  • People who go to bed late have less control over OCD symptoms
  • Green tea-capsaicin-ginger combo linked to weight and metabolic improvements

Grape consumption may offer benefits for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis

Texas Woman’s University, June 20, 2022

New research suggests that regular grape consumption may help alleviate pain associated with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee, and improve joint flexibility and overall mobility. Researchers attribute these potential benefits to the polyphenols found in grapes.

The sixteen week clinical study, undertaken by Texas Woman’s University, was designed to investigate the benefits of grape consumption on inflammation and osteoarthritis outcomes. 72 men and women with knee osteoarthritis (OA) were assigned to either consume grapes in the form of a whole grape freeze-dried powder, or a placebo powder.

The study results showed that both men and women consuming a grape-enriched diet had a significant decrease in self-reported pain related to activity and an overall decrease in total knee symptoms. This beneficial effect was more pronounced in females. Additionally, age-related differences were observed: there was a 70% increase in very hard activity for those under 64 years of age consuming the grape powder, while those receiving the placebo reported a significant decrease in very hard activity. Participants over 65 years, whether consuming grapes or the placebo, reported a decline in moderate to hard activities.

Evidence of increased cartilage metabolism was observed in men consuming the grape-enriched diet; they had higher levels of an important cartilage growth factor (IGF-1) than those on placebo. This protective effect was not observed in the females. T

Bad habits that lead to cancer, chronic disease corrected by simple lifestyle intervention

Northwestern University, June 19, 20122

Does this sound like someone you know? He or she spends too much time in front of screens, gets little exercise and eats a diet high in fat and low in fruits and vegetables. It likely sounds familiar because it describes a significant portion of the U.S. population.

A new Northwestern Medicine study found that a lifestyle intervention could fully normalize these four unhealthy behaviors, which put people at risk of developing heart disease and common cancers, including breast, colon and prostate.

“Our findings suggest that prevention of chronic disease through behavior change is feasible. They contradict the pessimistic assumption that it’s not possible to motivate relatively healthy people to make large, long-lasting healthy lifestyle changes,” said lead author Bonnie Spring at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

With the help of a smartphone app, a wearable activity tracker, some social support from a coach and a small financial incentive, study participants made large improvements in their eating and activity habits. From a starting point of less than two servings of fruits and vegetables per day, they increased their intake by 6.5 servings per day. They decreased saturated fat intake by 3.6 percent to consume less than 8 percent of their calories from saturated fat. From a baseline of 4.5 hours per day of leisure screen time, they decreased screen time by almost three hours and increased their moderate to vigorous exercise by 25 minutes per day over a nine-month trial.

Previous research has found that healthy behavior change usually reverts once financial incentives cease. But this study stopped offering the financial incentive after only 12 weeks, and participants still achieved positive results throughout the nine-month trial.

The blueberry component pterostilbene has potent anti-myeloma activity 

Tongji University (China), June 23, 2022

Investigators at Tongji University School of Medicine Zero  stated, “Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable hematologic malignancy because of its drug resistance. Pterostilbene (Pter) is found mainly in blueberries and grapes.”

The effects of Pter and its exact pharmacologic mechanisms on chemoresistant myeloma are not known. Herein, we investigated the anti-myeloma activity of Pter in bortezomib-resistant cell line H929R and explored the related mechanism of action for the first time. We found that Pter inhibited proliferation of H929R cells and promoted apoptosis of the cells through a caspase-dependent pathway, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and activation of Akt and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. DNA damage and S-phase arrest might be involved in Pter-related toxicity in H929R cells. 

The research concluded: “These data supported that Pter might be a promising natural compound for relapsed/refractory myeloma therapy, especially against myeloma resistant to bortezomib chemotherapy.”

Exercise makes the blood of obese people healthier

Exercise can reduce inflammation in obese people by changing the characteristics of their blood, according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology.

University of Illinois, June 20, 2022

Many of the health problems linked to obesity are a result of chronic inflammation. Inflammation is a natural process in the body in response to harm, but in obese people it can become long term and this can lead to damage of healthy tissue. Certain blood cells are more likely to cause inflammation, and if these cells are made in the body in greater numbers than normal they can spread to organs in the body and cause them to malfunction.

The blood cells responsible for causing inflammation are formed from stem cells within the body. 

This new research is the first to show that exercise alters the characteristics of these blood forming stem cells and therefore reduces the number of blood cells likely to cause inflammation. These findings provide a new explanation of how exercise may improve health in adults with obesity.

Young, lean adults and young, obese adults (who were otherwise healthy) were recruited for this study.  The exercise program consisted of three bicycling or treadmill running sessions per week with each session lasting approximately one hour. Blood was collected before and after the exercise training intervention to quantify blood-forming stem cells. The results of the study demonstrated that exercise reduced the number of blood-forming stem cells associated with the production of the type of blood cells responsible for inflammation.

People who go to bed late have less control over OCD symptoms

Binghamton University, June 24, 2022

A late bedtime is associated with lower perceived control of obsessive thoughts, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Binghamton University Professor Meredith E. Coles monitored twenty individuals diagnosed with OCD and ten individuals endorsing subthreshold OCD symptoms during one week of sleep. Participants completed sleep diaries and daily ratings of perceived degree of control over obsessive thoughts and ritualized behaviors. The researchers found that previous night’s bedtime significantly predicted participants’ perceived ability to control their obsessive thoughts and compulsive behavior on the subsequent day.

“We’re really interested in how this kind of unusual timing of sleep might affect cognitive functioning,” said Schubert. “It might be that something about shifting the timing of your sleep might reduce your ability to control your thoughts and your behaviors, so it might make it more likely that you’re going to have a hard time dismissing intrusive thoughts characteristic of obsessions, and it might make it more difficult for you to refrain from compulsive behaviors that are designed to reduce the anxiety caused by obsessive thoughts.”

On average participants in the study went to bed around 12:30 at night. Patients who met criteria for delayed sleep phase disorder, about 40% of the sample, went to bed around 3 a.m.

Green tea-capsaicin-ginger combo linked to weight and metabolic improvements

Kashan University of Medical Sciences (Iran), June 24, 2022

Dietary supplements containing green tea, capsaicin and ginger extracts may lead to weight loss and improvements in BMI, says a new study.

Data from the randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial involving 50 overweight women also produced beneficial changes in insulin levels, and measure of insulin resistance.

“Our study indicated that taking green tea, capsaicin and ginger co-supplements for 8 weeks among overweight women had beneficial effects on weight, BMI, markers of insulin metabolism and plasma [glutathione] levels,” wrote the scientists. 

Women were assigned to consume daily supplements containing 500 mg green tea, 100 mg capsaicin, and 200 mg ginger extracts, while another 25 women were assigned to consume placebo. After eight weeks, the results showed that, in addition to the improvements in body weight and BMI, women receiving the extracts showed significant decreases in serum insulin concentrations (-2.6 µIU/mL) compared to the placebo (-0.6 µIU/mL).

Insulin resistance, as measured by HOMA-IR, also improved compared to placebo, while levels of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione also improved in the women consuming the green tea, capsaicin and ginger supplements (+73.8 µmol/L), while levels decreased in the women receiving placebo (-28.3 µmol/L).

The Gary Null Show - 06.27.22

The Gary Null Show - 06.27.22

June 27, 2022

Video:

1. A Rockefeller Document: Resetting The US Food System – Control The Food – Control The People
2. Neil Oliver – ‘we’re definitely moving towards a one world government’ (3:45)
3.  Exclusive Klaus Schwab Tell All interview! – JP  (11:30)
4. A Rockefeller Document: Resetting The US Food System – Control The Food – Control The People (start @ 0:26 )
5. New Rule: How the Left Was Lost | Real Time (HBO)

HEALTH NEWS

  • Grape consumption may offer benefits for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis
  • Bad habits that lead to cancer, chronic disease corrected by simple lifestyle intervention
  • The blueberry component pterostilbene has potent anti-myeloma activity
  • Exercise makes the blood of obese people healthier
  • People who go to bed late have less control over OCD symptoms
  • Green tea-capsaicin-ginger combo linked to weight and metabolic improvements

Grape consumption may offer benefits for symptomatic knee osteoarthritis

Texas Woman’s University, June 20, 2022

New research suggests that regular grape consumption may help alleviate pain associated with symptomatic osteoarthritis of the knee, and improve joint flexibility and overall mobility. Researchers attribute these potential benefits to the polyphenols found in grapes.

The sixteen week clinical study, undertaken by Texas Woman’s University, was designed to investigate the benefits of grape consumption on inflammation and osteoarthritis outcomes. 72 men and women with knee osteoarthritis (OA) were assigned to either consume grapes in the form of a whole grape freeze-dried powder, or a placebo powder.

The study results showed that both men and women consuming a grape-enriched diet had a significant decrease in self-reported pain related to activity and an overall decrease in total knee symptoms. This beneficial effect was more pronounced in females. Additionally, age-related differences were observed: there was a 70% increase in very hard activity for those under 64 years of age consuming the grape powder, while those receiving the placebo reported a significant decrease in very hard activity. Participants over 65 years, whether consuming grapes or the placebo, reported a decline in moderate to hard activities.

Evidence of increased cartilage metabolism was observed in men consuming the grape-enriched diet; they had higher levels of an important cartilage growth factor (IGF-1) than those on placebo. This protective effect was not observed in the females. T

Bad habits that lead to cancer, chronic disease corrected by simple lifestyle intervention

Northwestern University, June 19, 20122

Does this sound like someone you know? He or she spends too much time in front of screens, gets little exercise and eats a diet high in fat and low in fruits and vegetables. It likely sounds familiar because it describes a significant portion of the U.S. population.

A new Northwestern Medicine study found that a lifestyle intervention could fully normalize these four unhealthy behaviors, which put people at risk of developing heart disease and common cancers, including breast, colon and prostate.

“Our findings suggest that prevention of chronic disease through behavior change is feasible. They contradict the pessimistic assumption that it’s not possible to motivate relatively healthy people to make large, long-lasting healthy lifestyle changes,” said lead author Bonnie Spring at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

With the help of a smartphone app, a wearable activity tracker, some social support from a coach and a small financial incentive, study participants made large improvements in their eating and activity habits. From a starting point of less than two servings of fruits and vegetables per day, they increased their intake by 6.5 servings per day. They decreased saturated fat intake by 3.6 percent to consume less than 8 percent of their calories from saturated fat. From a baseline of 4.5 hours per day of leisure screen time, they decreased screen time by almost three hours and increased their moderate to vigorous exercise by 25 minutes per day over a nine-month trial.

Previous research has found that healthy behavior change usually reverts once financial incentives cease. But this study stopped offering the financial incentive after only 12 weeks, and participants still achieved positive results throughout the nine-month trial.

The blueberry component pterostilbene has potent anti-myeloma activity 

Tongji University (China), June 23, 2022

Investigators at Tongji University School of Medicine Zero  stated, “Multiple myeloma (MM) is an incurable hematologic malignancy because of its drug resistance. Pterostilbene (Pter) is found mainly in blueberries and grapes.”

The effects of Pter and its exact pharmacologic mechanisms on chemoresistant myeloma are not known. Herein, we investigated the anti-myeloma activity of Pter in bortezomib-resistant cell line H929R and explored the related mechanism of action for the first time. We found that Pter inhibited proliferation of H929R cells and promoted apoptosis of the cells through a caspase-dependent pathway, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and activation of Akt and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. DNA damage and S-phase arrest might be involved in Pter-related toxicity in H929R cells. 

The research concluded: “These data supported that Pter might be a promising natural compound for relapsed/refractory myeloma therapy, especially against myeloma resistant to bortezomib chemotherapy.”

Exercise makes the blood of obese people healthier

Exercise can reduce inflammation in obese people by changing the characteristics of their blood, according to new research published in The Journal of Physiology.

University of Illinois, June 20, 2022

Many of the health problems linked to obesity are a result of chronic inflammation. Inflammation is a natural process in the body in response to harm, but in obese people it can become long term and this can lead to damage of healthy tissue. Certain blood cells are more likely to cause inflammation, and if these cells are made in the body in greater numbers than normal they can spread to organs in the body and cause them to malfunction.

The blood cells responsible for causing inflammation are formed from stem cells within the body. 

This new research is the first to show that exercise alters the characteristics of these blood forming stem cells and therefore reduces the number of blood cells likely to cause inflammation. These findings provide a new explanation of how exercise may improve health in adults with obesity.

Young, lean adults and young, obese adults (who were otherwise healthy) were recruited for this study.  The exercise program consisted of three bicycling or treadmill running sessions per week with each session lasting approximately one hour. Blood was collected before and after the exercise training intervention to quantify blood-forming stem cells. The results of the study demonstrated that exercise reduced the number of blood-forming stem cells associated with the production of the type of blood cells responsible for inflammation.

People who go to bed late have less control over OCD symptoms

Binghamton University, June 24, 2022

A late bedtime is associated with lower perceived control of obsessive thoughts, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York.

Binghamton University Professor Meredith E. Coles monitored twenty individuals diagnosed with OCD and ten individuals endorsing subthreshold OCD symptoms during one week of sleep. Participants completed sleep diaries and daily ratings of perceived degree of control over obsessive thoughts and ritualized behaviors. The researchers found that previous night’s bedtime significantly predicted participants’ perceived ability to control their obsessive thoughts and compulsive behavior on the subsequent day.

“We’re really interested in how this kind of unusual timing of sleep might affect cognitive functioning,” said Schubert. “It might be that something about shifting the timing of your sleep might reduce your ability to control your thoughts and your behaviors, so it might make it more likely that you’re going to have a hard time dismissing intrusive thoughts characteristic of obsessions, and it might make it more difficult for you to refrain from compulsive behaviors that are designed to reduce the anxiety caused by obsessive thoughts.”

On average participants in the study went to bed around 12:30 at night. Patients who met criteria for delayed sleep phase disorder, about 40% of the sample, went to bed around 3 a.m.

Green tea-capsaicin-ginger combo linked to weight and metabolic improvements

Kashan University of Medical Sciences (Iran), June 24, 2022

Dietary supplements containing green tea, capsaicin and ginger extracts may lead to weight loss and improvements in BMI, says a new study.

Data from the randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial involving 50 overweight women also produced beneficial changes in insulin levels, and measure of insulin resistance.

“Our study indicated that taking green tea, capsaicin and ginger co-supplements for 8 weeks among overweight women had beneficial effects on weight, BMI, markers of insulin metabolism and plasma [glutathione] levels,” wrote the scientists. 

Women were assigned to consume daily supplements containing 500 mg green tea, 100 mg capsaicin, and 200 mg ginger extracts, while another 25 women were assigned to consume placebo. After eight weeks, the results showed that, in addition to the improvements in body weight and BMI, women receiving the extracts showed significant decreases in serum insulin concentrations (-2.6 µIU/mL) compared to the placebo (-0.6 µIU/mL).

Insulin resistance, as measured by HOMA-IR, also improved compared to placebo, while levels of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione also improved in the women consuming the green tea, capsaicin and ginger supplements (+73.8 µmol/L), while levels decreased in the women receiving placebo (-28.3 µmol/L).

The Gary Null Show - 06.22.22

The Gary Null Show - 06.22.22

June 22, 2022

Videos:

1. The great recycling LIE (what really happens to plastic) (10:44)
2. Is It Game Over? New NASA Report (5:30)
2. You won’t believe what Justin Trudeau’s government just did | Redacted with Clayton Morris (13:26)
3. Neil Oliver – Who pulls the strings – Pandemic Treaty, Wealth & Power? (2:00)
4. He’s EXPOSING the truth in Syria and they don’t like it | Redacted conversation w/ Kevork Almassian (first 10:00)
5. Russian Ruble now best performing currency in the world this year… another example of how US sanctions have failed.
6. Vanessa Beeley and Eva Bartlett are smeared by the Guardian for reporting the truth (3:07)
7. Kim Iversen: Inside The SECRET Bilderberg Meetings Between Spies, War Hawks And World Leaders (9:28)
8. New Rule: The Misinformation Age | Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO)
9. https://theduran.locals.com/post/2311112/title 

10. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3maIN4-ZJl8 

 

Strawberry Compound Shown to Protect Against Alzheimer’s, Memory Loss

Salk Institute for Biological Studies, June 16, 2022 

The thought of losing your mind is a frightening one, but one in three Americans die with Alzheimer’s or some other form of dementia. Regardless how frightening the possibility is, the chances of it happening to you aren’t exactly slim, which means prevention should be at the forefront of your mind. A recent study from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies indicates prevention could be as simple as a natural foods diet—rich in fruits (such as strawberries) and vegetables containing something called fisetin.

Fisetin is a flavonol found in strawberries, mangoes, cucumbers, and other vegetables and fruits. Researchers with the Salk Institute found this simple compound can actually reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s in mice, and could be effective in humans as well.

Maher and her team have documented that fisetin has both anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties in the brain. It is also able to turn on a cellular pathway related to memory function.

The team looked to a type of mouse with mutated genes making them vulnerable to Alzheimer’s. At three months old, the researchers began feeding the mice a diet enriched with fisetin.

Mice who hadn’t received the fisetin began struggling in the mazes at nine months of age, but the fisetin mice performed as well as normal (non-predisposed) mice at both nine and twelve months of age.

Avocados may hold the answer to beating leukemia

University of Waterloo (Canada), June 16, 2022

Rich, creamy, nutritious and now cancer fighting. New research reveals that molecules derived from avocados could be effective in treating a form of cancer.

Professor Paul Spagnuolo from the University of Waterloo has discovered a lipid in avocados that combats acute myeloid leukemia (AML) by targeting the root of the disease – leukemia stem cells. Worldwide, there are few drug treatments available to patients that target leukemia stem cells.

“The stem cell is really the cell that drives the disease,” said Professor Spagnuolo, in Waterloo’s School of Pharmacy. “The stem cell is largely responsible for the disease developing and it’s the reason why so many patients with leukemia relapse. We’ve performed many rounds of testing to determine how this new drug works at a molecular level and confirmed that it targets stem cells selectively, leaving healthy cells unharmed.”

Inability to stand on one leg for 10 seconds in mid to later life linked to near doubling in risk of death

Exercise Medicine Clinic-CLINIMEX (Brazil) and University of Eastern Finland, June 21, 2022

The inability to stand on one leg for 10 seconds in mid- to later life is linked to a near doubling in the risk of death from any cause within the next 10 years, finds research published online in the British Journal of Sports Medicine

This simple and safe balance test could be included in routine health checks for older adults, say the researchers.

The researchers wanted to find out whether a balance test might be a reliable indicator of a person’s risk of death from any cause within the next decade, and, as such, might therefore merit inclusion in routine health checks in later life.

Participants were asked to stand on one leg for 10 seconds without any additional support. 

To improve standardization of the test, participants were asked to place the front of the free foot on the back of the opposite lower leg, while keeping their arms by their sides and their gaze fixed straight ahead. Up to three attempts on either foot were permitted.

In all, around 1 in 5 (20.5%; 348) participants failed to pass the test. The inability to do so rose in tandem with age, more or less doubling at subsequent 5 year intervals from the age of 51-55 onwards. 

The proportions of those unable to stand on one leg for 10 seconds were: nearly 5% among 51-55 year-olds; 8% among 56-60 year-olds; just under 18% among 61-65 year-olds; and just under 37% among 66-70 year-olds. 

More than half (around 54%) of those aged 71-75 were unable to complete the test. In other words, people in this age group were more than 11 times as likely to fail the test as those just 20 years younger.

During an average monitoring period of 7 years, 123 (7%) people died: cancer (32%); cardiovascular disease (30%); respiratory disease (9%); and COVID-19 complications (7%). The proportion of deaths among those who failed the test was significantly higher: 17.5% vs. 4.5%, reflecting an absolute difference of just under 13%.

Anxious Children have Bigger “Fear Centers” in the Brain

Stanford University School of Medicine, June 16, 2022

The amygdala is a key “fear center” in the brain. Alterations in the development of the amygdala during childhood may have an important influence on the development of anxiety problems, reports a new study in the current issue of Biological Psychiatry.



Researchers at the Stanford University School of Medicine recruited 76 children, 7 to 9 years of age, a period when anxiety-related traits and symptoms can first be reliably identified. 

The researchers found that children with high levels of anxiety had enlarged amygdala volume and increased connectivity with other brain regions responsible for attention, emotion perception, and regulation, compared to children with low levels of anxiety. They also developed an equation that reliably predicted the children’s anxiety level from the MRI measurements of amygdala volume and amygdala functional connectivity.

The most affected region was the basolateral portion of the amygdala, a subregion of the amygdala implicated in fear learning and the processing of emotion-related information.



Our study represents an important step in characterizing altered brain systems and developing predictive biomarkers in the identification for young children at risk for anxiety disorders,” Qin said. 

New research: Olive oil compound destroys cancer cells in 30 minutes

Rutgers University & Hunter College, June 12, 2022

 Oleocanthal, a polyphenolic, therapeutic compound found in olive oil is the subject of a new anti-cancer study performed by nutritional science and cancer biology researchers with The School of Environmental and Biological Sciences at Rutgers and Hunter’s College in New York City.

Programmed cell death, known as apoptosis takes approximately 16-24 hours. Dynamic new research just published in the Journal of Molecular and Cellular Oncology blew scientists away – when exposed to oleocanthal, a polyphenol compound found in olive oil, cancerous cells died within 30 minutes to an hour. While researchers previously understood that compounds in olive oil were capable of killing cancer cells, until now, such short apoptosis had not been observed.

Even more fascinating was when the team looked closely to surmise why apoptosis was occurring under such swift circumstances – they discovered that cancer cells were being killed by their own enzymes. And, not only one isolated type of cancerous cell, but all of the cancerous cells they were examining.

Unlike chemotherapeutic pharmaceuticals that devastate healthy cellular activity, the therapeutic polyphenolic compound found in olive oil kills cancer while maintaining vitality among healthy cells. As Paul Breslin, one of the study’s authors at Rutgers noted, while cancerous cells died, healthy cells were not harmed, but rather the oleocanthal “put them to sleep.” The lifecycle of healthy cells was only temporarily affected in this way, without any negative observations and in approximately 24 hours, the healthy cells resumed their life cycle. 

Sports, not screens: The key to happier, healthier children

University of South Australia, June 21, 2022

Whether it’s sports practice, music lessons or a casual catch up with friends, when children are involved in after-school activities, they’re more likely to feel happier and healthier than their counterparts who are glued to a screen.

In a new study conducted by the University of South Australia, researchers found that children’s well-being is heightened when they participate in extra-curricular activities, yet lowered when they spent time on social media or playing video games.

Published in BMC Pediatrics, the study analyzed data from 61,759 school students in years 4 to 9, assessing the average number of days per week children participated in after-school activities (3–6pm), and measure these against well-being factors—happiness, sadness, worry, engagement, perseverance, optimism, emotion regulation, and life satisfaction.

It found that most students watched TV about four days of the school week and spent time on social media about three days of the week.

Our study highlights how some out-of-school activities can boost children’s well-being, while others—particularly screens—can chip away at their mental and physical health. “Screens are a massive distraction for children of all ages. And whether children are gaming, watching TV or on social media, there’s something about all screens that’s damaging to their well-being.

Students in lower socio-economic backgrounds who frequently played sports were 15% more likely to be optimistic, 14% more likely to be happy and satisfied with their life, and 10% more likely to be able to regulate their emotions.

Conversely, children who played video games and used social media almost always had lower levels of well-being: up to 9% less likely to be happy, up to 8% to be less optimism and 11% to be more likely to give up on things.

The Gary Null Show - 06.21.22

The Gary Null Show - 06.21.22

June 21, 2022

Consumption of berries, fruits and vegetables and mortality among 10,000 Men Followed for four decades

Folkhalsan Research Center (Norway), June 17, 2022

Investigators from Folkhalsan Research Center in Norway found that consumption of berries, fruits and vegetables and mortality among 10,000 Norwegian men followed for four decades

"The association between vegetable and fruit consumption and risk of cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been investigated by several studies, whereas fewer studies have examined consumption of vegetables and fruits in relation to all-cause mortality. Studies on berries, a rich source of antioxidants, are rare."

"The purpose of the current study was to examine the association between intake of vegetables, fruits and berries (together and separately) and the risk of all-cause mortality and cause-specific mortality due to cancer and CVD and subtypes of these, in a cohort with very long follow-up. We used data from a population-based prospective Norwegian cohort study of 10,000 men. 

Men who in total consumed vegetables, fruit and berries more than 27 times per month had an 8-10 % reduced risk of all-cause mortality compared with men with a lower consumption. They also had a 20 % reduced risk of stroke mortality. Consumption of fruit was inversely related to overall cancer mortality, with hazard rate ratios of 0.94, 0.84 and 0.79 in the second, third and firth quartile, respectively, compared with the first quartile."

According to the news editors, the research concluded: "Increased consumption of vegetables, fruits and berries was associated with a delayed risk of all-cause mortality and of mortality due to cancer and stroke."

 

 

 

UA researchers discover component of cinnamon prevents colorectal cancer in mice

University of Arizona, June 15, 2022

Research conducted at the University of Arizona College of Pharmacy and the UA Cancer Center indicates that a compound derived from cinnamon is a potent inhibitor of colorectal cancer.

Georg Wondrak, Ph.D., recently completed a study in which they proved that adding cinnamaldehyde, the compound that gives cinnamon its distinctive flavor and smell, to the diet of mice protected the mice against colorectal cancer. In response to cinnamaldehyde, the animals' cells had acquired the ability to protect themselves against exposure to a carcinogen through detoxification and repair.

Given cinnamon's important status as the third-most-consumed spice in the world,' Wondrak adds, 'there's relatively little research on its potential health benefits. If we can ascertain the positive effects of cinnamon, we would like to leverage this opportunity to potentially improve the health of people around the globe.'

Drs. Wondrak and Zhang's study, 'Nrf2-dependent suppression of azoxymethane/dextrane sulfate sodium-induced colon carcinogenesis by the cinnamon-derived dietary factor cinnamaldehyde,' has been published in Cancer Prevention Research later this spring.

 

 

 
 

Lean tissue benefit of protein supplementation affirmed

Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (Brazil), June 17, 2022. 

A “systematic review of systematic reviews” published  in Sports Medicine showed that the addition of protein supplementation to resistance training is associated with a greater increase in lean body mass (body mass minus fat mass) in comparison with resistance training alone. 

Researchers in Brazil selected 46 studies in the meta-analyses involved a total of 2,925 men and women over 50 years of age. Supplemented groups received 12 to 40 grams of protein or 3 to 10 grams of amino acids while the control groups received a placebo or no supplementation.

Among the 4 meta-analyses that evaluated lean body mass, 3 found a significant increase in association with resistance training plus protein supplementation compared to resistance training without supplementation. There was also a significant benefit for protein supplementation combined with training on muscle mass alone.

“It is possible to conclude that protein supplementation associated with resistance training induces greater increases in lean body mass compared with resistance training alone in older participants. In addition, it is suggested that the effect of protein supplementation on lean body mass is extended to the increase in muscle mass, while no additional effect of protein supplementation was observed on muscle strength in older adults.”

 
 
 

Study shows inhaled toxic particles take direct route from lungs to brain

University of Birmingham, June 20, 2022

Breathing in polluted air could lead to toxic particles being transported from lungs to brain, via the bloodstream—potentially contributing to brain disorders and neurological damage, a new study reveals.

Scientists have discovered a possible direct pathway used by various inhaled fine particles through blood circulation with indications that, once there, the particles stay longer in the brain than in other main metabolic organs.

The scientists revealed they had found various fine particles in human cerebrospinal fluids taken from patients who had experienced brain disorders—uncovering a process which may result in toxic particulate substances ending up in the brain.

"The data suggests that up to eight times the number of fine particles may reach the brain by traveling, via the bloodstream, from the lungs than pass directly via the nose—adding new evidence on the relationship between air pollution and detrimental effects of such particles on the brain."

 

Turmeric: A Wellness Promoting Tonic At Low Doses, Research Reveals

Ohio State University, June 12, 2022

A study published in the Nutrition Journal   holds great interest among those on the fence about using dietary supplements to improve the quality and perhaps length of their lives, but for which clinical proof is lacking.

The study was conducted in healthy middle aged people (40–60 years old) with a low dose of curcumin (80 mg/day) in a fat soluble (lipidated) form.  Two groups of 19 subjects were given either curcumin or placebo for 4 weeks. Blood and saliva samples were taken before and after the 4 weeks and analyzed for the following blood and saliva measures relevant to health promotion The positive results were reported as follows:

  • Curcumin lowered triglycerides, but not cholesterol (note: lowering cholesterol may harm human health).
  • Curcumin increased plasma contents of nitric oxide, a molecule that can work against high blood pressure, as well as lowering plasma concentrations of sICAM, a molecule linked to atherosclerosis.
  • Curcumin raised plasma myeloperoxidase concentrations, without raising C-reactive protein and ceruloplasmin values – a sign of normal and inflammation-related neutrophil function.
  • Curcumin reduced salivary amylase activities, which are an indicator of sympathetic nervous system stress.
  • Curcumin raised salivary radical scavenging capacities, an indicator of reduced oxidative stress.·
  • Curcumin reduced plasma contents of beta amyloid protein, a marker for brain aging and Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Curcumin reduced ALT liver enzyme activities, a marker for liver injury.

 

Natural cocoa consumption: Potential to reduce atherogenic factors?

University of North Texas, June 17, 2022

According to news reporting in University of North Texas, research stated, "Short-term consumption of flavanol-rich cocoa has been demonstrated to improve various facets of vascular health. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effect of 4 weeks of natural cocoa consumption on selected cardiovascular disease (CVD) biomarkers in young (19-35 years) women of differing body mass indices (BMI)."

"Subjects (n=24) consumed a natural cocoa-containing product (12.7 g natural cocoa, 148 kcal/serving) or an isocaloric cocoa-free placebo daily for 4 weeks in a random, double-blind manner with a 2-week washout period between treatment arms. 

Natural cocoa consumption resulted in a significant decrease in haptoglobin, EMP concentration and monocyte CD62L in obese compared to overweight and normal-weight subjects. Natural cocoa consumption regardless of BMI group was associated with an 18% increase in high-density lipoprotein and a 60% decrease in EMPs. Also, obese subjects experienced a 21% decrease in haptoglobin and a 24% decrease in monocyte CD62L expression in following 4 weeks of natural cocoa consumption. Collectively, these findings indicate that acute natural cocoa consumption was associated with decreased obesity-related disease risk."

The Gary Null Show - 06.20.22

The Gary Null Show - 06.20.22

June 20, 2022

Videos:

1.Tucker Carlson Tonight – Friday, June 17 (12:30)
2. America’s wars: The invented reason and the real reason (2:12)
3. William Mandel Denounces HUAC: “This Collection of Judases”
4. NATO is a paper army (7:01)
5. What It’s Like Living in California Now (8:37) 

 

Pistachios may lower vascular response to stress in type 2 diabetes

Penn State University, June 17, 2022

Among people with type 2 diabetes, eating pistachios may reduce the body’s response to the stresses of everyday life, according to Penn State researchers.

“In adults with diabetes, two servings of pistachios per day lowered vascular constriction during stress and improved neural control of the heart,” said Sheila G. West, professor of biobehavioral health and nutritional sciences. “Although nuts are high in fat, they contain good fats, fiber, potassium and antioxidants. Given the high risk of heart disease in people with diabetes, nuts are an important component of a heart healthy diet in this population.”

West and her colleagues investigated the effects of pistachios on responses to standardized stress tasks in patients with well-controlled Type 2 diabetes who were otherwise healthy. They used a randomized, crossover study design in which all meals were provided. Each of the diets contained the same number of calories.

After two weeks on the typical American diet — containing 36 percent fat and 12 percent saturated fats — participants were randomized to one of two test diets. During the four-week test diets, participants ate only food supplied by the study. The researchers reported the results of this study in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Heart Association.

“We found that systolic blood pressure during sleep was particularly affected by pistachios,” she said. “Average sleep blood pressure was reduced by about 4 points and this would be expected to lower workload on the heart.” The researchers found that the pistachio diet lowered vascular constriction during stress. When arteries are dilated, the load on the heart is reduced. The physical challenge involved immersing one hand into icy water for two minutes.

Study finds curcumin, the main polyphenol in turmeric, as effective as Prozac in treating depression

Government Medical College (India), June 6, 2022

A recent study published in Phytotherapy Research shows that curcumin, the main polyphenol in turmeric, is as at least as effective as fluoxetine (Prozac) in treating depression.

Not only can it help ease symptoms of depression, but it does so safely, without the potential to cause suicidal thoughts, weight gain and even changes in blood pressure and heart rate that can lead to shock and death — some of the many side effects which have been linked to Prozac. 

The study, conducted by researchers from the Department of Pharmacology at the Government Medical College in Bhavnagar, India, assessed groups of people who took curcumin capsules and Prozac, either individually or combined.  Twenty people took 500 mg curcumin capsules twice daily, 20 took 20 mg of Prozac daily, and the remaining 20 people took a combination of the two.  The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale, a questionnaire designed to gauge the severity of a person’s depression level, was given to assess any changes in mood among the individuals who participated in this study.

The findings showed that curcumin worked just as well as Prozac, acting as the “first clinical evidence that curcumin may be used as an effective and safe modality for treatment in patients with MDD without concurrent suicidal ideation or other psychotic disorders.” (1, 3) MDD stands for “Major Depressive Disorder.”

Monkeys that eat omega-3 rich diet show more developed brain networks

University of Oregon, June 13, 2022  

Study gives new insight into similarity of complex brain networks in monkeys, humans

Monkeys that ate a diet rich in omega-3 fatty acids had brains with highly connected and well organized neural networks — in some ways akin to the neural networks in healthy humans — while monkeys that ate a diet deficient in the fatty acids had much more limited brain networking, according to an Oregon Health & Science University study.

The study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience, provides further evidence for the importance of omega-3 fatty acids in healthy brain development. It also represents the first time scientists have been able to use functional brain imaging in live animals to see the large-scale interaction of multiple brain networks in a monkey. These patterns are remarkably similar to the networks found in humans using the same imaging techniques.

The study measured a kind of omega-3 fatty acid called docosahexaenoic acid, or DHA, which is a primary component of the human brain and important in development of the brain and vision. 

The study found that the monkeys that had the high-DHA diet had strong connectivity of early visual pathways in their brains. It also found that monkeys with the high-DHA diet showed greater connections within various brain networks similar to the human brain — including networks for higher-level processing and cognition

‘Mini-strokes’ lead to PTSD and other psychiatric disorder

University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany  June 15, 2022 

Transient ischemic attacks are commonly referred to as “mini-strokes,” but this does not make them any less serious than major strokes. In fact, a recent study has found that around 30% of patients who have transient ischemic attacks go on to develop the symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) occur when the flow of blood to the brain is disrupted temporarily, often by blood clots or other debris. They differ from major strokes in that the flow of blood is only blocked for a relatively short time – usually no more than 5 minutes. 

Despite only disrupting blood flow temporarily, TIAs serve as warning signs for future major strokes. They indicate that there is a partially blocked artery or a clot source in the heart. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) report that between 10-15% of people with TIA will experience a major stroke within 3 months. 

“We found 1 in 3 TIA patients develop PTSD,” says study author Kathrin Utz from the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Germany. “PTSD, which is perhaps better known as a problem found in survivors of war zones and natural disasters, can develop when a person experiences a frightening event that poses a serious threat.”

The researchers found that about 30% of the TIA patients reported symptoms of PTSD and 14% showed signs of a significantly reduced mental quality of life. Around 6.5% of the participants also had a reduced physical quality of life. 

TIA patients who showed signs of PTSD were also more likely to show signs of depressionanxiety and a lower overall quality of life than those who did not. 

Exercise linked to brain cell growth and improved memory

University of Jyvaskyla (Finland), June 14, 2022

New research out of the University of Jyvaskyla in Finland has shown that exercise helps with preserving brain cells and preventing loss of memory, cognitive issues and general memory problems.

In the Finnish study, aerobic activity in particular was found to support healthier brain cells and prevent memory problems better than other exercise types studied, including weight lifting and high-intensity interval training (HIIT).

While weight lifting and HIIT have better fat burning properties, moderate aerobic exercise seems to cultivate healthier brain cells and protect against loss of memory.

For the study, University of Jyvaskyla researchers put groups of rats on three different workout programs to determine their effects on memory and overall brain health. Weight lifting, running and high-intensity interval training were the three types studied. The training regimens created were made to model approximately what the typical human might do in a workout program. The running group used a treadmill much as humans do, and the weight lifting group climbed a ladder with little weights attached to their tails. The HIIT group alternated short durations of sprinting and jogging.

By study’s end, while all of the rats showed general fitness gains, the weight lifting group and the HIIT group showed no signs of neurogenesis, or new brain cell growth. By contrast, the running group demonstrated growth in brain cells as well as a reduction in the loss of memory and memory problems.

Organic food consumers have a 21% lower risk of pre-eclampsia

Norwegian Institute of Public Health, June 15, 2022

 Pregnant women may be able to lower their risk of a potentially deadly complication known as pre-eclampsia by more than 20 percent simply by eating more organic vegetables, according to a study conducted by researchers from the National Institute for Consumer Research and the Norwegian Institute of Public Health, and published in BMJ Open.

“The result is intriguing and supports that diet during pregnancy can influence the risk of pre-eclampsia,” researcher Hanne Torjusen, PhD, said.

Pre-eclampsia is a complication of late pregnancy characterized by high blood pressure and protein in the urine. The cause of the condition is not known, although it has been linked to a variety of risk factors including some of the same risk factors as cardiovascular disease. Mild cases may resolve without problems, but severe cases may progress into a life-threatening condition that can only be alleviated through premature delivery of the baby.

The new study is the first to show a connection between organic food consumption and lower pre-eclampsia risk.

The Gary Null Show - 06.17.22

The Gary Null Show - 06.17.22

June 17, 2022

Videos:

1. Agenda 2030 and the World Economic Forum Plan to Remake the World: Alex Newman (26:00)

2. Pfizer Docs Reveal 800 People Never Finished Trial Due To Death Or Injury (4:39)

3. Vaccines, what are they good for? – Dr Sam Bailey (19:00)

 4. Bodily Autonomy is Only Supported When Coupled With The Abortion Agenda (1:00)

 5. New Rule: The Misinformation Age | Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO)

6. George Carlin – It’s A BIG Club & You Ain’t In It! 

 

Active Component of Grape Seed Extract Effective Against Cancer Cells

University of Colorado Cancer Center, June 13 2022

 A University of Colorado Cancer Center study published online ahead of print in the journal Nutrition and Cancer describes the laboratory synthesis of the most active component of grape seed extract, B2G2, and shows this synthesized compound induces the cell death known as apoptosis in prostate cancer cells while leaving healthy cells unharmed.

“We’ve shown similar anti-cancer activity in the past with grape seed extract (GSE), but now we know B2G2 is its most biologically active ingredient which can be synthesized in quantities that will allow us to study the detailed death mechanism in cancer cells,” says Alpna Tyagi, PhD, of the University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences.

The group pinpointed B2G2 as the most active compound, but, “it’s expensive and it takes a long time to isolate B2G2 from grape seed extract,” Tyagi says.

This expense related to the isolation of B2G2 has limited the group’s further exploration. So instead of purifying B2G2 from GSE, the group decided to synthesize it in the lab. The current study reports the success of this effort, including the ability to synthesize gram-quantity of B2G2 reasonably quickly and inexpensively.

In the paper’s second half, the group shows anti-cancer activity of synthesized B2G2 similar in mechanism and degree to overall GSE effectiveness.

Improving Memory Naturally: Sage Contains Similar Compounds as Modern Alzheimer’s Drugs

Newcastle and Northumbria Universities, June 14 2022

Sage was named “Herb of the Year” in 2001 by the International Herb Association. 

Some of the latest research shows how sage can boost memory and cognitive health. The leaves and stems of sage contain these antioxidant enzymes that protect against free radical oxidative cell damage as well as provide inflammatory relief from ailments such as arthritis and asthma.

The Medicinal Plant Research Centre (MPRC) of England conducted studies at Newcastle and Northumbria Universities with sage oil herb pills against placebo pills. Those who took the sage performed much better with a word recall test than those who took the placebo. 

In the long run, home-made tinctures are the most economical way to have and use highly effective tinctures for a long time. 

Trade the chair for fresh air: Study explores link between sitting time and cardio health

Simon Fraser University (Canada), June 15 2022

New research is adding further weight to the argument that prolonged sitting may be hazardous to your health. An international study surveying more than 100,000 individuals in 21 countries found that people who sat for six to eight hours a day had a 12–13 percent increased risk for early death and heart disease, while those who sat for more than eight hours daily increased that to a sobering 20 percent.

Their research followed individuals over an average of 11 years and determined that high amounts of sitting time were associated with increased risk of early death and cardiovascular disease

Not surprising, those who sat the most and were the least active had the highest risk—up to 50 percent—while those who sat the most but were also the most active had a substantially lower risk of about 17 percent.

“For those sitting more than four hours a day, replacing a half hour of sitting with exercise reduced the risk by two percent,” Lear notes. “With only one in four Canadians meeting the activity guidelines there’s a real opportunity here for people to increase their activity and reduce their chances of early death and heart disease.”

Acupuncture Can Treat Alzheimer’s Disease

Hubei University of Chinese Medicine (China), June 5, 2022 

An increasing number of clinical and animal studies have confirmed that acupuncture is effective for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease. Moxibustion is reported to be more effective than electro-acupuncture for improving space-recognizing memory ability in aged mice, suggesting that moxibustion is another alternative or complementary therapy used to treat Alzheimer’s disease.

Dr. Yanjun Du and team from Hubei University of Chinese Medicine, China only used suspended moxibustion (also named warming moxibustion, scarring moxibustion, or herb-partition moxibustion) on Baihui and Shenshu  acupoints to observe the action of pre-moxibustion on preventing apoptosis in a rat model of Alzheimer’s disease.

The pre-moxibustion group was treated with moxibustion for eight courses (each course lasting for 6 days) prior to the exposure and 14 days after Aβ1–42 exposure.  Moxibustion prior to Aβ1–42 exposure was more effective than moxibustion after Aβ1–42 exposure in protecting the neuronal structure and lowering the apoptosis rate.

Their findings indicate that a combination of preventive and therapeutic moxibustion has a beneficial effect for the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease development.

Men and women with brain condition could be helped by vitamin E

Cangzhou Central Hospital (China), June 15 2022. 

Leukoaraiosis is an abnormality in the brain’s white matter that appears on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as white matter hyperintensities. In an article published in the International Journal of Neuroscience, researchers at Cangzhou Central Hospital in Hebei, China reported improvements in factors related to leukoaraiosis among adults given supplements containing vitamin E.

“Leukoaraiosis (LA) is a disease manifested by demyelination and gliosis in white matter, mainly caused by cerebrovascular diseases,” Yan Wang and colleagues wrote.  “Leukoaraiosis is closely related to the expression level of inflammatory factors, oxidative stress, and vascular endothelial dysfunction in patients. Vitamin E may play antioxidant and anti-inflammatory roles in various diseases.”

Participants received 200 IU, 400 IU or 600 international units (IU) vitamin E or a placebo daily for 12 weeks. At the end of the treatment period, blood samples were evaluated for the inflammatory factors C-reactive protein, complement C3 and C4, and matrix metalloproteins 2 and 9, as well as for markers of oxidative stress and endothelial function (function of the lining of the arteries, which is impaired in cerebrovascular and cardiovascular disease).

Inflammation, oxidative stress and endothelial function improved in all groups that received vitamin E in comparison with the placebo. Cognitive function scores also significantly improved in the vitamin E-treated groups. Improvement in all measured factors was correlated with higher doses of vitamin E.

Chlorogenic acid plus chromium improves insulin resistance and lowers obesity in mice

University of Toledo, June 10 2022

In an article published in Nutrition & Metabolism, University of Toledo researchers report that a combination of chromium and chlorogenic acid (CGA), a polyphenol occurring in coffee, reversed the development of obesity and insulin resistance in mice caused by the intake of a high-fat diet.

Sonia M. Najjar and her associates fed male BL6 mice a standard diet or a high-fat diet for seven weeks. During the last three weeks of the diet, the high-fat group received a daily oral supplement containing water, chlorogenic acid, or a combination of chlorogenic acid and chromium in a base that contained caffeine. Body weight was measured weekly, insulin tolerance was assessed at four and seven weeks, and glucose and glucose tolerance were assessed at the end of the treatment period.

At four weeks, animals supplemented with chlorogenic acid and the combination of chlorogenic acid and chromium experienced weight loss within two weeks, and attained weights comparable to those of animals that received a standard diet. While insulin resistance after four weeks was greater among high-fat diet-fed mice compared to those fed a standard diet, supplementation with chlorogenic acid plus chromium reduced this effect, and restored it to a level comparable to that of standard-diet-fed mice. Glucose tolerance and glucose levels were similarly restored in animals that received the supplement combination. 

The Gary Null Show  06.16.22

The Gary Null Show 06.16.22

June 16, 2022

VIDEOS:

1. Klaus Schwab and  Yuval Harari speaks at the WEF 
2. Agenda 2030 and the World Economic Forum Plan to Remake the World: Alex Newman (26:00)
3. Can’t Hide from Vaccine Injury When It’s In Your Face Every Day (1:49)
4. Bodily Autonomy is Only Supported When Coupled With The Abortion Agenda (1:00)
5. Abby Martin: ‘Coups and Regime Change Wars Define U.S.’s Naked Imperialism’ (12:10)
6. German Government JAILING Journalists! – Inside Russia Report (start @ 0:58) – 8:06
7. New Rule: The Misinformation Age | Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO)

 

Acai and brain health: Has study unlocked Amazonian fruit’s neuroprotective effects?

University of Adelaide, June 10, 2022

The potential brain health benefits of açai may be linked to an inhibition of the aggregation of beta-amyloid proteins, says a new study from Australia.

The build-up of plaque from beta-amyloid deposits is associated with an increase in brain cell damage and death from oxidative stress. This is related to a loss of cognitive function and an increased risk of Alzheimer’s, the most common form of dementia and currently affects over 13 million people worldwide.

Researchers from the University of Adelaide have now reported that select polyphenols from the native South American palm berry may inhibit this build-up and explain the reported neuroprotective effects of açai.

To-date, pulp of acai has been demonstrated to affect cell signaling, enzyme activity, maintenance of the oxidant and antioxidant balance, receptor sensitivity, gene regulation, and reduction in the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, while restoring or maintaining functional cellular antioxidant status.

Açai extracts and berry pulp possess high levels of anti-oxidants which are generally attributed to mitigating the damaging effects of reactive oxygen species in cell culture. However, distinct neuroprotection to beta-amyloid loss of viability by açai is a novel finding. 

Nuts and peanuts may protect against major causes of death

Maastricht University (Netherlands), June 11, 2022

A paper published in the International Journal of Epidemiology confirms a link between peanut and nut intake and lower mortality rates, but finds no protective effect for peanut butter. Men and women who eat at least 10 grams of nuts or peanuts per day have a lower risk of dying from several major causes of death than people who don’t consume nuts or peanuts.

The reduction in mortality was strongest for respiratory disease, neurodegenerative disease, and diabetes, followed by cancer and cardiovascular diseases. The effects are equal in men and women. Peanuts show at least as strong reductions in mortality as tree nuts, but peanut butter is not associated with mortality, researchers from Maastricht University found.

The associations between nuts and peanut intake and cardiovascular death confirm earlier results from American and Asian studies that were often focused on cardiovascular diseases. However, in this new study, it was found that mortality due to cancer, diabetes, respiratory, and neurodegenerative diseases was also lowered among users of peanuts and nuts. 

Are highly processed foods bad for children? 

Study finds an association between consuming more ultraprocessed foods and lower levels of physical fitness in children

Sacred Heart University, June 14, 2022

A new study found that children ages 3 to 5 who consumed more ultraprocessed foods had poorer locomotor skills than children who consumed less of these foods. It also showed lower cardiovascular fitness in 12- to 15-year-olds who consumed more ultraprocessed foods.

Although previous research has shown that consuming ultraprocessed foods is linked with a higher risk for cardiovascular disease in adults, this is one of the first studies to show a link between consumption of these foods and lower levels of physical fitness in children.

Ultraprocessed foods were categorized in this study as including packaged snacks, breakfast cereals, candies, soda, sweetened juices and yogurts, canned soups and prepared foods like pizza, hotdogs, burgers and chicken nuggets.

For children 5 years old and under, the researchers used locomotor development as a measure of physical fitness. The analysis revealed that children with the lowest locomotor development scores consumed 273 calories more per day of ultraprocessed foods than children with the highest locomotor development scores.

Cardiovascular fitness was used as a physical fitness measure in the older children. The study showed that teens and preteens with good cardiovascular fitness consumed 226 fewer calories daily from ultraprocessed foods than those who did not have healthy cardiovascular fitness.

Qatar Omicron-wave study shows slow decline of natural immunity, rapid decline of vaccine immunity

Weill Cornell Medical College,, June 15, 2022

A recent Pfizer or Moderna mRNA-vaccine booster provided good but temporary protection against infection by the SARS-CoV-2 Omicron variant, according to a study from researchers at Weill Cornell Medicine—Qatar.

In the study, published June 15 in the New England Journal of Medicine, the researchers analyzed the Omicron wave in Qatar last winter, comparing prior infections, vaccine immunity and combinations thereof among more than 100,000 Omicron-infected and non-infected individuals.

The analysis showed vaccine immunity against new infection appeared to wane rapidly, whereas people with a prior-variant infection were moderately protected from Omicron with little decline in protection even a year after their prior infection.

A key finding was that a history of vaccination with the standard two doses of either the Pfizer or Moderna mRNA vaccine, but no history of prior infection, brought no significant protection against symptomatic omicron infection. Having a booster dose appeared to be about 60 percent protective, though most boosters were received just weeks before the Omicron wave. Overall, the analysis suggested—consistently with prior studies—that mRNA vaccines and boosters work fairly well in protecting against symptomatic omicron infection, though their protective effect wanes rapidly and disappears within six months or so.

For those with no history of vaccination, SARS-CoV-2 infection during a prior-variant wave  was associated with almost the same degree of protection even a year after infection.

Study links sugar-sweetened beverage consumption with liver cancer

Large study of postmenopausal women suggests avoiding sweetened beverages could help reduce likelihood of developing liver cancer

University of South Carolina, June 14, 2022

A study of more than 90,000 postmenopausal women found that those who consumed at least one sugar-sweetened beverage daily faced a 78% higher risk of developing liver cancer compared with people who consumed less than three servings per month of such beverages.

“Our findings suggest sugar-sweetened beverage consumption is a potential modifiable risk factor for liver cancer,” said Longgang Zhao, at the University of South Carolina, the study’s lead author. “If our findings are confirmed, reducing sugar-sweetened beverage consumption might serve as a public health strategy to reduce liver cancer burden. Replacing sugar-sweetened beverages with water, and non-sugar-sweetened coffee or tea could significantly lower liver cancer risk.”

For the new study, researchers analyzed data from 90,504 postmenopausal women who participated in the Women’s Health Initiative, a long-term study launched in the early 1990s. Researchers assessed sugar-sweetened beverage intake based on validated food frequency questionnaires and confirmed liver cancer diagnoses using participants’ medical records.

About 7% of participants reported consuming one or more 12-ounce servings of sugar-sweetened beverages per day and a total of 205 women developed liver cancer. Women consuming one or more sugar-sweetened beverages daily were 78% more likely to develop liver cancer and those consuming at least one soft drink per day were 73% more likely to develop liver cancer compared with those who never consumed these beverages or  consumed less than three servings per month.

Most people think their diet is healthier than it is

U.S. Department of Agriculture, June 14, 2022

How healthy is your diet? It seems like a simple question, but according to a new study, it’s one that most Americans struggle to get right.

“We found that only a small percentage of U.S. adults can accurately assess the healthfulness of their diet, and interestingly, it’s mostly those who perceive their diet as poor who are able to accurately assess their diet,” said Jessica Thomson, PhD, research epidemiologist with the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Agricultural Research Service in the Southeast Area, the study’s lead author. “Additionally, most adults overrate the quality of their diet, sometimes to a substantial degree.”

The study revealed significant disconnects between the researcher-calculated scores and how participants ranked their own diet. Out of over 9,700 participants, about 8,000 (roughly 85%) inaccurately assessed their diet quality. Of those, almost all (99%) overrated the healthfulness of their diet.

Surprisingly, accuracy was highest among those who rated their diet as poor, among whom the researcher’s score matched the participant’s rating 97% of the time. The proportion of participants who accurately assessed their diet quality ranged from 1%-18% in the other four rating categories.

The Gary Null Show - 06.15.22

The Gary Null Show - 06.15.22

June 15, 2022

Videos:

1.Covid has torn apart our social fabric (Feat. Dr. Matt Strauss)

2.  A Christian Response to Wokeness (FULL VIDEO) | Noelle Mering | Leadership Institute (21:51)
3.  NBC News just SMEARED real journalists in shameful hit piece | Redacted with Clayton Morris (22:00)
4. COME HELL OR HIGH WATER! Four minutes of WOW! (talking about the shootings and blame)

 

Vitamin D deficiency directly linked to dementia

University of South Australia, June 14, 2022

Dementia is one of the major causes of disability and dependency among older people worldwide, affecting thinking and behaviors as you age. But what if you could stop this degenerative disease in its tracks?

A world-first study from the University of South Australia could make this a reality as new genetic research shows a direct link between dementia and a lack of vitamin D.

Investigating the association between vitamin D, neuroimaging features, and the risk of dementia and stroke, the study found:

  • low levels of vitamin D were associated with lower brain volumes and an increased risk of dementia and stroke
  • genetic analyses supported a causal effect of vitamin D deficiency and dementia.
  • in some populations as much as 17% of dementia cases might be prevented by increasing everyone to normal levels of vitamin D (50 nmol/L).

Flaxseed supplements linked to improved blood pressure: Meta-analysis

University of Medicine and Pharmacy (Romania), June 9, 2022

Supplements of flaxseed may effectively management blood pressure, says a new meta-analysis of 15 clinical trials.

Data from 1,302 participants indicated that flaxseed supplements are associated with significant reductions in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure of about 2.85 mmHg and 2.39 mmHg, respectively.

“The results obtained in the present meta-analysis – a decrease of 2.85/2.39 mmHg after flaxseed supplementation – might be valuable for the hypertension management using nutraceuticals, since Heart Outcome Evaluation study demonstrated that a 3.3/1.4 mmHg reduction was associated with a 22% decline of relative risk of cardiovascular mortality,” wrote scientists from Romania, Iran, Australia and Poland in Clinical Nutrition .

The scientists also report that supplementation for longer than 12 weeks resulted in even greater reductions in systolic and diastolic blood pressure of 3.10 mmHg and 2.62 mmHg, respectively, compared to trials of shorter duration.

The potential biological mechanism are not completely understood, said the researchers, but could be linked to the lignan content of flaxseed. Specifically, a lignan named SDG is known to be an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor. ACE inhibitors work by inhibiting the conversion of angiotensin I to the potent vasoconstrictor, angiotensin II, thereby improving blood flow and blood pressure.

Finally, an arginine-rich protein fraction (KCl-F1) from flaxseed may also impact blood pressure.

Flaxseed powder supplements were found to affect systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), whereas flaxseed oil preparations only affected DBP. On the other hand, lignan extracts was not associated with any changes in SBP and DBP, they said.

Keep calm and carry on — for the sake of your long-term health

Penn State University, June 9, 2022

Reacting positively to stressful situations may play a key role in long-term health, according to researchers.

In a study measuring adults’ reactions to stress and how it affects their bodies, researchers found that adults who fail to maintain positive moods such as cheerfulness or calm when faced with the minor stressors of everyday life appear to have elevated levels of inflammation. Furthermore, women can be at heightened risk.

Nancy Sin, in the Center for Healthy Aging, Penn State and her colleagues showed that the frequency of daily stressors, in and of itself, was less consequential for inflammation than how an individual reacted to those stressors.

“A person’s frequency of stress may be less related to inflammation than responses to stress,” said Sin. “It is how a person reacts to stress that is important.”

In the short-term, with illness or exercise, the body experiences a high immune response to help repair itself. However, in the long term, heightened inflammatory immune responses may not be healthy. Individuals who have trouble regulating their responses may be at risk for certain age-related conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, frailty and cognitive decline, Sin said.

“To our knowledge, this paper is the first to link biomarkers of inflammation with positive mood responses to stressors in everyday life,” said Jennifer E. Graham-Engeland, associate professor of biobehavioral health, Penn State.

For breast cancer prevention, diet quality matters

Healthy, plant-based diet linked with lower cancer risk for postmenopausal women 

Paris-Saclay University (France), June 14, 2022

Research shows that what we eat can influence our cancer risk, but it’s not always clear which foods or dietary patterns are best for cancer prevention. Results from a new study suggest that the quality or overall healthiness of a person’s diet may be key.

The study, based on data from over 65,000 postmenopausal women who were tracked for more than two decades, found that a healthy plant-based diet was linked with a 14% lower risk of breast cancer while an unhealthy plant-based diet was linked with a 20% higher risk of breast cancer. The findings were consistent across all breast cancer subtypes.

“These findings highlight that increasing the consumption of healthy plant foods and decreasing the consumption of less healthy plant foods and animal foods might help prevent all types of breast cancer,” said Sanam Shah, at Paris-Saclay University, Gustave Roussy, France, the study’s lead author. 

Previous studies have examined cancer risks associated with various dietary patterns such as the Western diet, the Mediterranean diet and vegetarian diets. Although some studies suggest diets with less or no meat consumption offer health benefits, results have been somewhat mixed. For the new study, researchers focused on differentiating between healthy plant-based foods — such as whole grains, fruit, vegetables, nuts, legumes, vegetable oils and tea or coffee — and plant-based foods the study categorized as less healthy including fruit juices, refined grains, potatoes, sugar-sweetened beverages and desserts.

Regular exercise beneficial in suppressing inflammation in rheumatic disease

Exercise results in physiological changes that decrease inflammation on a local and systemic level

Ohio State University, June 12, 202

Research findings suggest that exercise transiently suppresses local and systemic inflammation, reinforcing the beneficial effects of exercise and the need for this to be regular in order to achieve clinical efficacy in rheumatic disease.

These new research findings focused on the physiological changes created by exercise and their impact on inflammation. The researchers have found that exercise generates a true biological response and induces changes on a molecular level that stimulate anti-inflammatory effects.

This in-vivo study measured the regulation and activation of NF-kB* in mice. NF-kB, a protein complex that controls many genes involved in inflammation, is found to be chronically active in many inflammatory diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease and arthritis.

The effect of exercise on the inhibition of NF-kB activation was identified as a transient effect, lasting only 24 hours after exercise.The role of exercise in inhibiting NF-kB activation was linked to the suppression of multiple pro-inflammatory cytokines. 

Keeping the faith – or your willingness to push yourself – as you grow older

Norwegian University of Science and Technology, June 14, 2022

So you could have become a pro footballer when you were younger, you say? Or really good at chess? Perhaps a world-renowned chef?

Well, maybe not anymore, we think as we get older. And maybe that’s actually okay.

A research group has investigated how important the motivational factors for becoming really proficient at a skill change over the years.

“We wanted to see how the passion, grit and belief that you’ll succeed at getting better – your growth mindset – change with age and in relation to gender,” says Hermundur Sigmundsson, a professor at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology’s (NTNU) Department of Psychology.

“The passion for what you used to burn for declines. And so does the belief that you can succeed at becoming really good at it,” says Professor Sigmundsson.

But this is where it is important to take hold of yourself and not give up. You might not become a world champion in anything, but you could still get really proficient if you go for it. Or at least better.

“That’s when it’s important to maintain a growth mindset. You can’t stop believing in growth even though you’re getting older,” says Sigmundsson.

“Passion and a growth mindset decrease with age, but the willingness to persevere increases if we look at the elderly population as a whole,” says Sigmundsson.

The Gary Null Show - 06.14.22

The Gary Null Show - 06.14.22

June 14, 2022

Videos:

1. Assange Countdown: In Depth with Dr. George Szamuely (0:20)
2. Frank Zappa – 1979
3. Our freedom is under attack by those who care more for power than for the Constitution, the Bill of Rights & the American people. – Tulsi Gabbard (0:41)
4. Woody Allen speech from movie The Front (0:60)
5.  A Christian Response to Wokeness (FULL VIDEO) | Noelle Mering | Leadership Institute (21:51)
6.  NBC News just SMEARED real journalists in shameful hit piece | Redacted with Clayton Morris (22:00)
7. Propaganda disguised as education | Let’s talk about it – Riks (Start @ 0:58)

 

Nuts Increase Cognitive Scores Among Elderly Women

Harvard University and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, June 4th 2022 

Researchers from Harvard University and Brigham and Women’s Hospital have confirmed that eating more nuts every day will increase cognitive skills – at least among elderly women.

For six years, the researchers followed 16,010 women who 70 years old or older, and 15,467 completed the final cognitive interviews.

The researchers found those women who consumed five servings or more of nuts each week had higher scores on their cognitive testing compared to those who did not consume nuts. The average difference in scores was 0.08 units, which is equivalent to two years of cognition decline during the aging process.

The mechanism may be related to the fact that nuts are heart-healthy. And nut consumption has been associated with cardiovascular healthand mortality in other research.

Stress accelerates immune aging, study finds

University of Southern California, June 13, 2022

Stress—in the form of traumatic events, job strain, everyday stressors and discrimination—accelerates aging of the immune system, potentially increasing a person’s risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease and illness from infections such as COVID-19, according to a new USC study.

The research, published  in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), could help explain disparities in age-related health, including the unequal toll of the pandemic, and identify possible points for intervention.

USC researchers decided to see if they could tease out a connection between lifetime exposure to stress—a known contributor to poor health—and declining vigor in the immune system.

As expected, people with higher stress scores had older-seeming immune profiles, with lower percentages of fresh disease fighters and higher percentages of worn-out white blood cells. The association between stressful life events and fewer ready to respond, or naive, T cells remained strong even after controlling for education, smoking, drinking, BMI and race or ethnicity.

CoQ10 supplementation associated with lower pro-inflammatory factors in randomized trial

Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences (Iran), June 8 2022. 

A double-blind trial reported in a recent issue of the International Journal of Vitamin and Nutrition Research found a reduction in markers of inflammation in mildly hypertensive patients given coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) for twelve weeks. Participants who received CoQ10 also experienced an increase in adiponectin: a protein secreted by adipose tissue that has an anti-inflammatory effect and which has been found to be reduced in high blood pressure and cardiovascular disease.

“Considering that coenzyme Q10 has attracted noticeable attention in recent years for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases and hypertension in regard to its effect on inflammatory factors such as cytokines, it is therefore hypothesized that supplementation with coenzyme Q10 reduces the proinflammatory factors,” write Nasim Bagheri Nesami of Iran’s Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences and colleagues. “This study was conducted in order to determine the effects of coenzyme Q10 on proinflammatory factors as well as on adiponectin in patients with mild hypertension.”

Sixty men and women were randomized to receive 100 milligrams CoQ10 or a placebo for a twelve week period. Plasma adiponectin, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP, a marker of inflammation) and the cytokines interleukin 2, interleukin6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha were measured before and after treatment.

At the end of the study, participants who received CoQ10 had significant declines in interleukin-6 and hs-CRP compared with levels measured upon enrollment. They also experienced an increase in adiponectin, while levels in the placebo group slightly declined.

Probiotics prevent deadly complications of liver disease

Govind Ballabh Pant Hospital, New Delhi, India   June 6, 2022

Probiotics are effective in preventing hepatic encephalopathy in patients with cirrhosis of the liver, according to a new study in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Hepatic encephalopathy is a deterioration of brain function that is a serious complication of liver disease.

“This rigorous new research finds that probiotics modify the gut microbiota to prevent hepatic encephalopathy in patients with cirrhosis of the liver,” said David W. Victor III, MD. “These results offer a safe, well-tolerated and perhaps cheaper alternative to current treatments.”

When comparing treatment with probiotics versus placebo, the researchers found that the incidence of hepatic encephalopathy was lower in patients treated with probiotics.  Probiotic supplementation was not associated with any side effects and none of the patients required discontinuation of therapy. These results suggest that probiotics are similar in effectiveness to the current standard of care, lactulose, in the prevention of hepatic encephalopathy, yet they appear to be much better tolerated. The effectiveness of lactulose, a nonabsorbable disaccharide, is limited by side effects (diarrhea, bloating and gas) and a narrow therapeutic window. 

Chelation therapy and vitamin supplements cut heart disease risk by over 25%

Columbia University, June 9, 2022 

A combination of high-dose multivitamins and chelation therapy may protect heart attack survivors from future cardiovascular events and death, according to a multicenter study published in the American Heart Journal.

Intravenous chelation, in which the chemical ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) is injected into the bloodstream in order to bind to minerals and help flush them from the body, is an FDA-approved treatment for heavy metal poisoning that was first used during World War I. 

“They’re all in our environment. Any of us who are of an age to have been exposed to leaded gasoline have lead in our bones. If we get an infusion of EDTA, we’ll have lead in our urine. It’s just the way it is. And as you get older and become osteoporotic, that lead starts getting released.”

In a randomized, double-blind trial, the researchers randomly assigned 1,708 stable heart attack survivors at 134 clinics across the United States to one of four experimental conditions: high-dose oral multivitamins plus chelation, chelation plus a vitamin-mimicking placebo, vitamins plus a chelation-mimicking placebo or double placebo. Participants had to get a 500 cc intravenous infusion once per week for 30 weeks, followed by another 10 infusions spaced two to eight weeks apart. All participants also had to take six large capsules daily.

The researchers found that chelation alone led to a statistically significant 18 percent reduction in primary endpoint, relative to placebo. Chelation plus multivitamins led to a 26 percent reduction in risk over placebo. Chelation plus multivitamin also reduced the secondary endpoint by 34 percent, compared with placebo.

Diabetic participants benefited even more dramatically. Among diabetics, chelation resulted in a 41 percent reduction in primary endpoint, while chelation plus vitamins resulted in a 51 percent reduction. The rate of all-cause mortality in diabetic patients dropped 43 percent with chelation alone, and the secondary endpoint was also reduced.

Natural Pain Killer With Powerful Ability to Remove Blood Clots and Dead Tissue

GreenMed Info, June 13th 2022 

Serrapeptase, also known as serratiopeptidase or serralysin, is a systemic enzyme, specifically it is a proteolytic enzyme. Serrapeptase was first derived from a species of bacteria found in the intestine of the silkworm. The bacteria, Serratia mercesans E1, produces serrapeptase to help breakdown the silkworm coccoon to free the silk moth.

A review study summarized that serrapeptase has immense applications in therapeutic areas which have been validated by several in vitroin vivo, and clinical studies. “These applications are attributable to its versatile properties including anti-inflammatory, anti-biofilm, analgesic, anti-edemic, and fibrinolytic effects.”

Serrapeptase has been used for a wide range of health concerns: 

Serrapeptase for Joint Swelling

Serrapeptase is effective in reducing post-operative joint swelling in comparison to other therapies such as applying ice. 

Serrapeptase Dissolves Blood Clots, Dead Tissue, Biofilms

Anticoagulants and antiplatelet drugs are used for managing cardiovascular diseases but they are unable to dissolve an existing blood clot. Serrapeptase dissolves a fibrin clot within a blood vessel.  Studies have shown that serrapeptase can digest dead tissues, blood clots, cysts, biofilm and arterial plaques. 

Serrapeptase for Acute or Chronic Ear, Nose and Throat Conditions

The Journal of International Medical Research published the results of a study evaluating the efficacy and tolerability of serrapeptase using a double-blind, placebo-controlled study of 193 subjects suffering from acute or chronic ear, nose or throat disorders. Patients treated with serrapeptase reported significant symptom regression within 3 – 4 days. It was concluded that serrapeptase “has anti-inflammatory, anti-oedemic and fibrinolytic activity and acts rapidly on localized inflammation.” 

COVID-19 and Chronic Respiratory Conditions

A 2021 study, showed, “Proteolytic enzymes can be useful in the treatment of nosocomial, viral, and resistant infections, especially in pediatric and geriatric age groups due to its relative safety, less tolerance and resistance and its synergic effects.” 

Physicians have observed many COVID-19 cases with heart problems, kidney problems, and the presence of blood clots. Serrapeptase helps patients with chronic airway disease by reducing coughing and lessening viscosity of sputum. As a natural anticoagulant it interferes with platelet aggregation and the blood coagulation cascade. Serrapeptase has an anti-inflammatory impact on the tissue inflammation that contributes to the blood clot formation. 

The Gary Null Show - 06.13.22

The Gary Null Show - 06.13.22

June 13, 2022

Videos:

1. Water Crisis Clip – 19:05* ‘Five-alarm fire’: Arizona water crisis accelerates with tough choices ahead – The Arizona Republic’s Joanna Allhands
Sacrificing Lake Mead to Save Lake Powell – timeBomb
Lake Mead Is Almost Empty – The Other Me
40 Million People Rely on the Colorado River, and Now It’s Drying Up – Vice
The Town Trying to Pump Billions of Gallons of Water to Their Desert Community – Vice
2. Assange Countdown: In Depth with Dr. George Szamuely (0:20)
3. NBC News just SMEARED real journalists in shameful hit piece | Redacted with Clayton Morris (22:00)
4. Propaganda disguised as education | Let’s talk about it – Riks (Start @ 0:58)
5. A Christian Response to Wokeness (FULL VIDEO) | Noelle Mering | Leadership Institute
6. Woody Allen speech from movie The Front

 

Olive oil nutrient may help prevent brain cancer

Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell Biology, June 10, 2022 A compound found in olive oil may help to prevent cancer developing in the brain, a study shows.Research into oleic acid – the primary ingredient in olive oil – has shown how it can help prevent cancer-causing genes from functioning in cells.The oily substance – one of a group of nutrients known as fatty acids – stimulates the production of a cell molecule whose function is to prevent cancer-causing proteins from forming.Scientists from the University analysed the effect of oleic acid on a cell molecule, known as miR-7, which is active in the brain and is known to suppress the formation of tumours. They found that oleic acid prevents a cell protein, known as MSI2, from stopping production of miR-7. In this way, the olive oil component supports the production of miR-7, which helps prevent tumours from forming.Researchers made their discoveries in tests on human cell extracts and in living cells in the lab.

CDC lists oil of lemon eucalyptus as comparable to DEET for mosquitoes

CDC, June 9, 2022

Even the CDC recommends this botanical ingredient as comparable to DEET for repelling disease-carrying insects.

While DEET is the gold standard of insect repellents, it is also a strong synthetic chemical with a tarnished reputation. Known to the chemistry set as N,N-Diethyl-meta-toluamide, DEET was potentially linked to cases of brain damage in the 1980s and 90s, inciting a flood of fear amongst consumers that has yet to recede.

BUT, there’s an alternative. Behold oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE), the plant-based active ingredient derived from eucalyptus leaves and approved for efficacy by the CDC.

“Oil of lemon eucalyptus (OLE) or PMD (chemical name: para-menthane-3,8-diol), the synthesized version of OLE. Products containing OLE and PMD include, but are not limited to, Repel and Off! Botanicals. This recommendation refers to EPA-registered products containing the active ingredient OLE (or PMD). “Pure” oil of lemon eucalyptus (essential oil not formulated as a repellent) is not recommended; it has not undergone similar, validated testing for safety and efficacy and is not registered with EPA as an insect repellent.”

Just 5 Minutes Of Breath Training Every Day Makes Exercise Easier For Adults

University of Colorado, June 11, 2022

A handheld device which builds breathing muscles could help older people get in shape. Doing just five minutes of the breath training exercises every day for more than six weeks improved people’s performance on the treadmill by 12 percent, according to scientists. Adults are recommended to log 150 minutes of moderate exercise a week. Now scientists have come up with a simple way of making exercising on the treadmill easier for those struggling to get running.

“Developing novel forms of physical training that increase adherence and improve physical function are key to reducing the risk of chronic diseases with aging,” says lead researcher Kaitlin Freeberg, of the University of Colorado, in a statement. “High-resistance IMST (high-resistance inspiratory muscle strength training) may be one such strategy to promote adherence and improve multiple components of health in midlife and older adults.”

IMST involves inhaling through a handheld device which adds resistance to the breath. A total of 35 adults were divided into two groups, a high resistance training group and a low resistance control group. Participants used a manual breathing trainer for 30 breaths a day, or around five minutes, over a period of six weeks.

Those who were part of the high-resistance group improved their treadmill time by 12 percent, the researchers report. Participants in the high-resistance group also showed a relationship with changes in 18 metabolites tested in the study, “predominantly ones that play key roles in energy production and fatty acid metabolism.”

Pregnant women produce super antibodies to protect newborns, now scientists know how

Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, June 8, 2022

Scientists discovered years ago that newborn infants depend upon immune components transferred from their mothers to survive the onslaught of pathogens that begin invading their bodies as soon as they are born. 

Now, a far-reaching study published in Nature, provides a surprising explanation of how those early days of mother-provided immunity actually work–and what that information could mean for preventing death and disability from a wide range of infectious diseases. 

“For many years, scientists believed that antibodies cannot get inside cells. They don’t have the necessary machinery. And so, infections caused by pathogens that live exclusively inside cells were thought to be invisible to antibody-based therapies,” says Sing Sing Way, MD, Ph.D., Division of Infectious Diseases at Cincinnati Children’s. “Our findings show that pregnancy changes the structure of certain sugars attached to the antibodies, which allows them to protect babies from infection by a much wider range of pathogens.” 

“The maternal-infant dyad is so special. It’s the intimate connection between a mother and her baby,” says John Erickson, MD, Ph.D., Division of Neonatology, and first-author of the study.

Erickson continues, “This special connection starts when babies are in the womb and continues after birth. I love seeing the closeness between mothers and their babies in our newborn care units. This discovery paves the way for pioneering new therapies that can specifically target infections in pregnant mothers and newborns babies. I believe these findings also will have far-reaching implications for antibody-based therapies in other fields.”

Fasting boosts stem cells’ regenerative capacity

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, June 3, 2022 

As people age, their intestinal stem cells begin to lose their ability to regenerate. These stem cells are the source for all new intestinal cells, so this decline can make it more difficult to recover from gastrointestinal infections or other conditions that affect the intestine.

This age-related loss of stem cell function can be reversed by a 24-hour fast, according to a new study from MIT biologists. The researchers found that fasting dramatically improves stem cells’ ability to regenerate, in both aged and young mice.

In fasting mice, cells begin breaking down fatty acids instead of glucose, a change that stimulates the stem cells to become more regenerative. The researchers found that they could also boost regeneration with a molecule that activates the same metabolic switch. Such an intervention could potentially help older people recovering from GI infections or cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, the researchers say.

“This study provided evidence that fasting induces a metabolic switch in the intestinal stem cells, from utilizing carbohydrates to burning fat,” Sabatini says. “Interestingly, switching these cells to fatty acid oxidation enhanced their function significantly. Pharmacological targeting of this pathway may provide a therapeutic opportunity to improve tissue homeostasis in age-associated pathologies.”

After mice fasted for 24 hours, the researchers removed intestinal stem cells and grew them in a culture dish, allowing them to determine whether the cells can give rise to “mini-intestines” known as organoids.

The researchers found that stem cells from the fasting mice doubled their regenerative capacity.

The Gary Null Show - 06.10.22

The Gary Null Show - 06.10.22

June 10, 2022

Is your high blood sugar caused by electromagnetic hypersensitivity?

Trent University (Ontario), June 1, 2022

Experts believe that the shocking epidemic of type 2 diabetes is being driven by lifestyle factors, primarily obesity and inactivity. But, evidence is accumulating that hypersensitivity to electromagnetic fields can cause high blood sugar, raising the possibility that a third form of the disease – “type 3 diabetes” – could be caused by this form of environmental pollution.

Case studies show that high blood sugar is triggered by exposure to “dirty electricity”

According to peer-reviewed research  published in Electromagnetic Biology and Medicine, “dirty electricity,” or transient electrical fields, can affect blood sugar levels in diabetic individuals who are electrically sensitive.

Dr. Havas, an Associate Professor of Environmental and Resource Studies at Trent University, presented case studies showing that plasma glucose levels increased in response to electromagnetic pollution.

Dr. Havas noted that people with unexplained rises in blood sugar could potentially be electrosensitive – and, in fact, suffering type 3 diabetes. (With 3 to 35 percent of the population experiencing electrosensitivity, as many as 5 to 60 million diabetics worldwide could be affected by this perplexing and under-diagnosed condition!)

Electrosensitivity (ES), also known as electrical sensitivity, electromagnetic hypersensitivity and cellphone sickness, was originally termed “radio wave sickness.” It was officially identified in the 1970s by Russian doctors to describe an occupational syndrome developed by workers who were exposed to microwave or radiofrequency radiation.

Symptoms occur when an individual is exposed to wireless technologies or electrical devices such as cell phone towers, “smart” meters, WiFi routers, power line magnetic fields, plasma TVs, laptops, cell phones, energy-efficient lighting, fluorescent lighting and dimmer switches.

The symptoms can be mild or severe, and can include headaches, dizziness, heart palpitations, insomnia, memory problems, depression and fatigue. Numbness and tingling, high blood pressure, nosebleeds, tinnitus (ringing in the ears) and shortness of breath can also be indications of electrosensitivity.

And, in spite of the item’s name, you shouldn’t work with a laptop on your lap.

Avoiding smart meters, sleeping in an electricity-free bedroom, and eliminating dimmer switches are also wise moves, while installing Graham/Stetzer filters can help you cut down on “dirty electricity.”

The takeaway: if you have been diagnosed with diabetes and are electrosensitive, cutting down on your EMF exposure is a commonsense choice you can make today.

 
 

A polyphenol-rich diet prevents inflammation in older people 

University of Barcelona (Spain), June 8, 2022

Polyphenols in the foods that we eat can prevent inflammation in older people, since they alter the intestinal microbiota and induce the production of the indole 3-propionic acid (IPA), a metabolite derived from the degradation of tryptophan due to intestinal bacteria. This is stated in a study published in the journal Molecular Nutrition and Food Research, carried out by the Research Group at the University of Barcelona and the CIBER on Fragility and Healthy Ageing

The study shows the interaction between polyphenols and gut microbiota can induce the proliferation of bacteria with the ability to synthetize beneficial metabolites, such as IPA, a postbiotic with antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective properties that contributes to improve the health of the intestinal wall. Therefore, this compound would contribute to the prevention of some diseases associated with ageing.

“If we consider the beneficial effects of IPA on the gut microbiota and health in general, it is important to find reliable strategies to promote the production of this metabolite.

As part of the study, the researchers carried out a multiomic analysis on faecal samples of fifty-one volunteers aged over sixty-five who kept following a diet rich in polyphenols (green tea, bitter chocolate, fruits including apples, pomegranate and blueberries) for eight weeks.

The results show that the diet rich in polyphenols generated a significant increase in the blood IPA levels, together with a decrease in inflammation levels and changes in the bacteria of the microbiota, from the order of Bacteroidales.

 

Study shows people with a high omega-3 DHA level in their blood are at 49% lower risk of Alzheimer’s

Fatty Acid Research Institute, June 9, 2022

New research published today in Nutrients shows that people with a higher blood DHA level are 49% less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease vs. those with lower levels, according to the Fatty Acid Research Institute (FARI). The study, led by Aleix Sala-Vila, PhD, suggested that providing extra dietary omega-3 DHA, especially for those carrying the ApoE4 gene (which approximately doubles an individual’s susceptibility to develop AD) might slow the development of the disease. Such a cost-effective, low-risk dietary intervention like this could potentially save billions in health care costs.

In this prospective observational study conducted within the Framingham Offspring Cohort — including 1490 dementia-free participants aged ≥65 years old —  researchers examined the association of red blood cell (RBC) docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) with incident Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), while also testing for an interaction with APOE-ε4 carriership.

Tthe researchers noted that an increased intake of DHA might lower risk for developing AD, particularly in higher-risk individuals such as those carrying the APOE-ε4 allele, suggesting that they may benefit more from higher DHA levels than non-carriers.

 
 

Vegan diet rich in legumes beneficial for decreased weight in new study

Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine, June 8, 2022

A vegan diet improves diet quality, leading to decreased weight and improved insulin sensitivity, according to a new study by the Physicians Committee for Responsible Medicine published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Decreased weight was most associated with increased intake of legumes and decreased intake of meat, fish, and poultry.

“Our research shows that the best way to improve the quality of your health is to improve the quality of the foods you eat,” says Hana Kahleova, MD, PhD, director of clinical research at the Physicians Committee and a study co-author. “That means avoiding animal products and eating a vegan diet rich in fruits, vegetables, grains, and beans.”

The participants in the 16-week study included 244 overweight adults who were randomly assigned to either make no diet changes or to follow a low-fat vegan diet, without calorie restrictions, consisting of vegetables, grains, legumes, and fruits. Researchers tracked diet quality, body weight, fat mass, and insulin sensitivity. The final data analysis included 219 participants who completed the whole study and submitted their final diet records.

Participants on the vegan diet lost an average of 13 pounds and 9.1 pounds of fat mass. Body weight and fat mass did not decrease in the group that made no diet changes. In the vegan group, increases in fruit, legume, meat alternative, and whole grain intake and decreases in animal products, added oils, and animal fats were associated with weight loss:

  • Fruit: Increased intake of whole fruit was associated with a decrease in body weight.
  • Legumes and Meat Alternatives: Increased legume consumption was associated with decreased weight, fat mass, and visceral adipose tissue. Consuming more meat alternatives, including tofu, tempeh, and veggie burgers, was associated with a decrease in body weight.
  • Grains: Increased consumption of whole grains was associated with decreased body weight and fat mass.
  • Eggs and Dairy Products: Decreased egg intake was correlated with decreased weight. Decreased high-fat dairy intake was associated with decreased weight and fat mass.
  • Meat, Fish, and Poultry: Reductions in the combined intake of total meat, fish, and poultry were associated with weight loss and a decrease in fat mass.
  • Added Fats: Decreases in intake of added animal fats were associated with decreases in weight and fat mass. Decreased intake of added oils also correlated with decreases in weight and fat mass.

The vegan group also experienced improvements in insulin sensitivity.

 

Western diets rich in fructose and fat cause diabetes via glycerate-mediated loss of pancreatic islet cells

Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Innovation, June 9, 2022

 

Those who are habitually inclined to consume burgers, fries and soda may think twice about their dietary choices following scientists' latest findings about high-fat, high-fructose diets.

As reported in their recent publication in Cell Metabolism, the Terasaki Institute for Biomedical Innovation (TIBI), discovered that a high-fat diet can increase fructose metabolism in the small intestine, leading to release of a fructose-specific metabolite called glycerate into circulation. Circulating glycerate can subsequently cause damage of the insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, increasing the risk of glucose tolerance disorders, such as Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM).

Although T2DM is typically found in older people, it has been occurring more and more in younger people. In the past two decades alone, T2DM has doubled in prevalence. Equally concerning are the health risks associated with T2DM, including heart disease and stroke

In T2DM, there are insufficient levels of insulin, a hormone that regulates movement of glucose into peripheral cells. To compensate for this, the pancreas overworks to secrete additional insulin, with eventual loss of this ability. The result is an unhealthy accumulation of glucose in the blood.

Collectively, the scientists' findings suggest that a prolonged exposure to high levels of glycerate due to excessive consumption of western diets rich in dietary fructose and fat poses the risk of damage to the pancreatic islet cells and development of diabetes.

 

New study associates intake of dairy milk with greater risk of prostate cancer

Loma Linda University, June 9, 2022

 

Men with higher intakes of dairy foods, especially milk, face a significantly higher risk of prostate cancer compared to men with lower intakes, according to a new study conducted by researchers at Loma Linda University Health. The study found no such associations between increased prostate cancer risk and intake of non-dairy calcium, suggesting substances other than calcium play a role in the risk dairy foods poses for prostate cancer.

The study's results reveal that men who consumed about 430 grams of dairy per day (1 ¾ cups of milk) faced a 25% increased risk of prostate cancer compared to men who consumed only 20.2 grams of dairy per day (1/2 cup of milk per week). Also, men who consumed about 430 grams of dairy per day faced an even greater increase in risk when compared to men with zero dairy intake in their diets.

Fraser noted that the results had minimal variation when comparing intake of full fat versus reduced or nonfat milks; there were no important associations reported with cheese and yogurt.

 

The Gary Null Show - 06.09.22

The Gary Null Show - 06.09.22

June 9, 2022

Videos:

1. Jonathan Pie: ‘Boris Johnson Is a Liar’ | NYT Opinion (7:42)

2.  Dr Gabor Maté Leaves the Audience SPEECHLESS | One of the Best Speeches Ever (10:36)

Zinc found to play an important role in lung fibrosis

Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, June 8, 2022

Investigators from the Women’s Guild Lung Institute at Cedars-Sinai have discovered that zinc, a common mineral, may reverse lung damage and improve survival for patients with a deadly age-related condition known as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF).”This study has the potential to be a game changer,” said Paul Noble, MD, chair of the Department of Medicine. “We identified a root cause of IPF-related lung damage and a potential therapeutic target that might restore the lungs’ ability to heal themselves.”

Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, or IPF, affects 100,000 people in the U.S. and has no known cause. The condition, which leads to scarring of the lungs, called fibrosis, and progressive breathing difficulty, has no cure, and most patients die or require a lung transplant within three to five years of diagnosis. The incidence of IPF rises dramatically with age and affects men more often than women.

(NEXT)

Do optimists live longer?

Harvard School of Public Health, June 8, 2022

In a study published in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society that included a racially diverse group of 159,255 women, higher levels of optimism were associated with longer lifespans and a greater likelihood of living past 90 years of age. Investigators found that the link between optimism and longevity was evident across racial and ethnic groups, and that lifestyle factors accounted for nearly one-quarter of the optimism-lifespan association. 

(NEXT)

Sweet cherry anthocyanins support liver health… for rats at least

Zhei-Jang University (China), June 1, 2022

Anthocyanins from sweet cherries may protect against diet-induced liver steatosis, or excessive amounts of fat in the liver’s tissue, says a new study with rats. 

The study, published in the journal Nutrition, built upon the abundant existing literature on the beneficial role anthocyanins have as an antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and anti-hyperlipidemic component. Specifically, the cyanidin-3-glucoside variant “[has] been reported to ameliorate hepatic steatosis and adipose inflammation,” the researchers wrote. The condition known as liver steatosis is a common non-alcoholic fatty liver disease usually treated with drugs, but according to the researchers, some drug used for treatment “are usually accompanied by some adverse effect.” For 15 weeks, the researchers investigated the effects of sweet cherry anthocyanin supplementation have on alleviating high-fat diet-induced liver steatosis in rodents to explore the possibility of a none-drug treatment for the liver condition. According to the researchers, the results demonstrated how sweet cherry anthocyanins may be developed into a supplement to “protect from high-fat diet-induced hepatic steatosis in mice,”leading to a suggested potential for the anthocyanin’s application in the “treatment of hepatic steatosis and other obesity related metabolic disorders.”

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Bad dreams could be early warning of Parkinson’s disease

University of Birmingham, June 8, 2022

Older adults who start to experience bad dreams or nightmares could be exhibiting the earliest signs of Parkinson’s disease, say researchers at the University of Birmingham. A new study, published in eClinicalMedicine, showed that in a cohort of older men, individuals experiencing frequent bad dreams were twice as likely to be later diagnosed with Parkinson’s as those who did not.Previous studies have shown that people with Parkinson’s disease experience nightmares and bad dreams more frequently than adults in the general population, but using nightmares as a risk indicator for Parkinson’s has not previously been considered.”While we need to carry out further research in this area, identifying the significance of bad dreams and nightmares could indicate that individuals who experience changes to their dreams in older age—without any obvious trigger—should seek medical advice.” The team used data from a large cohort study from the U.S., which contained data over a period of 12 years from 3818 older men living independently.  Participants reporting bad dreams at least once per week were then followed up at the end of the study to see whether they were more likely to be diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease.

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Beetroot boosts sporting performance in athletes

University of South Australia, June 8, 2022

Evaluating the performance effects of foods that are thought to have a beneficial effect on aerobic performance, researchers found that beetroot, grapes, sour cherries, and pine bark extract, which contribute to nitric oxide availability in the body, boost endurance exercise performance. Assessing data from 118 studies involving 1,872 participants from 25 different countries, the meta-analysis evaluated the effect of consuming nitrate-rich foods (typically green leafy vegetables), foods that contain polyphenols (such as berries, cherries and cocoa), and L-Citrulline (found in watermelon) on exercise endurance performance. The study, published in the Journal of the International Society of Sports Nutrition, found that the nitrate levels contained in beetroot, which have been shown to boost blood flow and increase the delivery of nutrients and oxygen to muscles during exercise, helped athletes perform better more quickly.

The Gary Null Show - 06.08.22

The Gary Null Show - 06.08.22

June 8, 2022

Video:

 Edward Dowd: Economic Fallout of Covid Vax Fraud (start @ 1:00 Stop @ 14:45)

Asian Plum extract significantly benefit liver functions over placebo

Stragen Pharma (Switzerland),

The Asian plum of the rosaceae family, has been studied for its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and liver protecting properties. A study funded by Swiss company Stragen Pharma looks deeper into how this plum extract can benefit the liver.

“Most of the currently available data supporting a potential hepatoprotective [liver protecting] effect of P. mume  have been obtained using in vitro testing, in vivo  animal models, or non-controled human trials,” the researchers wrote in the study published in Phythotherapy Research.

Hence, the current study was the first that looked into the effects of two doses of a P. mune extract supplement on liver enzymes through a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study.

From the 44 subjects who participated throughout the 3-month long study, researchers found a “beneficial and statistically significant effect versus placebo of P. mune extract on liver function.”

Researchers found that, over the course of the study, participants supplemented with the low dose of Prunus mume experienced significant decreases in their high aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, and gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase liver enzymes, all of which induce hepatotoxicity, whereas the high dose group did not experience significant changes in their liver enzymes.

Dietary fiber in the gut may help with skin allergies, says new study

Monash University (Australia),

A Monash University study exploring the emerging gut-skin axis has found that microbial fermentation of dietary fiber in the gut can protect against allergic skin disease. The research could potentially lead to novel treatments to prevent or treat allergies.

Professor Ben Marsland from the Central Clinical School’s Department of Immunology, together with Swiss colleagues at the University Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV), showed that the fermentation of fiber in the gut by bacteria and subsequent production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), in particular butyrate, protected against atopic dermatitis in mice. 

University of Maine study shows chocolate is brain food

University of Maine,

University of Maine published findings in the journal Appetite, saying people who ate chocolate at least once per week performed better on multiple cognitive tasks compared to those who ate chocolate less frequently.

“We don’t know if people are going to get smarter,” Elias, a psychologist and epidemiologist, said from his office on the Orono campus. “What we found out is that people who ate chocolate performed better [on cognitive functions] than people who did not.”

The study, directed by Elias, tracked more than 1,000 people over 35 years and looked specifically at chocolate consumption’s effect on visual-spatial memory and organization, working memory, abstract verbal reasoning, scanning and tracking and overall cognitive functioning.

“We did not follow cognitive function over time and see any rise in intelligence,” he said. “What we did find was that people who ate chocolate on a regular basis performed better on cognitive functions than people who did not.”

The researchers hypothesized that regular intake of cocoa flavanols may be one of several mechanism explaining the cognitive benefits of chocolate. According to the team’s publication, flavonols have multiple effects on the brain on the cellular and molecular levels in the regions involved in learning and memory and by increasing blood flow in the brain promoting development of new blood vessels.

Want to reduce stroke risk? Sit less. Move more. Do chores.

San Diego State University,

Imagine watching “The Batman” movie back-to-back four times every day or driving a whopping 390 miles each way on a daily commute. Either uncomfortable choice will take about 12 hours—or the same amount of time most Americans stay seated throughout any day.

The dangerous consequences of prolonged inactivity in humans are widely known. Too much sitting leads to an increased risk of heart disease, Type 2 diabetes, and other chronic illnesses, including depression. To offset the severe side effects of a sedentary lifestyle, doctors recommend adults complete at least 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous aerobic exercise a week. 

However, a new study from San Diego State University, published in JAMA Network Open, found that doing lighter intensity daily activities such as household chores can significantly reduce the risk of stroke

“Light-intensity physical activity can include vacuuming, sweeping the floor, washing the car, leisure strolling, stretching, or playing catch,” said Steven Hooker, dean of SDSU’s College of Health and Human Services and lead researcher of the cohort study. 

They found those who were sedentary for 13 hours or more a day had a 44% increased risk of having a stroke. 

Uncovering why playing a musical instrument can protect brain health

Baycrest Center for Geriatric Care (Canada),

A recent study conducted at Baycrest Health Sciences has uncovered a crucial piece into why playing a musical instrument can help older adults retain their listening skills and ward off age-related cognitive declines. This finding could lead to the development of brain rehabilitation interventions through musical training.

The study, published in the Journal of Neuroscience  found that learning to play a sound on a musical instrument alters the brain waves in a way that improves a person’s listening and hearing skills over a short time frame. This change in brain activity demonstrates the brain’s ability to rewire itself and compensate for injuries or diseases that may hamper a person’s capacity to perform tasks.

This finding supports Dr. Ross’ research using musical training to help stroke survivors rehabilitate motor movement in their upper bodies. Baycrest scientists have a history of breakthroughs into how a person’s musical background impacts the listening abilities and cognitive function as they age and they continue to explore how brain changes during aging impact hearing.

The study involved 32 young, healthy adults who had normal hearing and no history of neurological or psychiatric disorders. The brain waves of participants were first recorded while they listened to bell-like sounds from a Tibetan singing bowl (a small bell struck with a wooden mallet to create sounds). After listening to the recording, half of the participants were provided the Tibetan singing bowl and asked to recreate the same sounds and rhythm by striking it and the other half recreated the sound by pressing a key on a computer keypad.

“This study was the first time we saw direct changes in the brain after one session, demonstrating that the action of creating music leads to a strong change in brain activity.”

Effect of Korean Red Ginseng on Cognitive Function and Quantitative EEG in Alzheimer Patients

Seoul Medical Center  (Korea) 

According to news reporting originating in Seoul, South Korea  research stated, “Korean red ginseng (KRG) has a nootropic effect. This study assessed the efficacy of red ginseng on cognitive function and quantitative electroencephalography (EEG) in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD).”

Research from Seoul Medical Center stated “Fourteen patients with AD (mean age, 74.93 years; 11 women and 3 men) were recruited and treated with KRG (4.5 g per day) for 12 weeks. EEG performed before and after treatment were analyzed with quantitative spectral analysis. The Frontal Assessment Battery score improved significantly after 12 weeks of treatment. In the relative power spectrum analysis performed according to responsiveness, alpha power increased significantly in the right temporal area of the responders. The increments of relative alpha power in the right temporal, parietal, and occipital areas were significantly higher in the responders than the nonresponders.”

According to the news reporters, the research concluded: “This study indicates the efficacy of KRG on frontal lobe function in AD, related to increasing relative alpha power.”

The Gary Null Show - 06.07.22

The Gary Null Show - 06.07.22

June 7, 2022

Videos:

1. Stefan Oelrich, head of Bayer’s Admits COVID-19 Vaccine is Gene Therapy (0:40)
2. Munk Debate on Ukraine – John Mearsheimer Closing Statement (3:06)
3. Jonathan Pie: ‘Boris Johnson Is a Liar’ | NYT Opinion (7:42)
4.  “Uniquely Stupid:” Dissecting the Past Decade of American Life | Amanpour and Company (18:09)
5. New Rule: The United States of Dumb-merica | Real Time with Bill Maher (HBO) (10:00)
6. You’re Not Going To Believe What I’m About To Tell You – The Oatmeal (7:53)

Researchers investigate cancer-fighing properties of mango

Texas A&M University

In addition to being one of the most important tropical fruits consumed worldwide, recent studies by researchers at the Institute for Obesity Research and Program Evaluation at Texas A&M University in College Station have shown that mangoes also may help prevent breast cancer. Talcott and others recently completed one in vitro study and one using mice to see if the polyphenols found in mango did, in fact, exhibit inflammation- and cancer-fighting properties. “There was already some research done showing that polyphenolic compounds, such as those found in the mango, have cancer-fighting properties,” Talcott said. “Those compounds appear to have antioxidant properties that may contribute to decrease oxidative stress, which can lead to the onset of chronic diseases such as cancer. In addition to that, polyphenolics have been shown to be anti-inflammatory.” Talcott said interest in mango has been increasing in recent years and experimental data has already shown bioactive compounds present in mangoes exert anti-inflammatory, anti-carcinogenic, antiviral and antibacterial properties.  “Based on this premise, we extracted mango polyphenols and tested their effects in vitro, or separate from their normal biological context, on commercially obtained non-cancer and cancer breast cells,” she said. These results of the study indicate that the cell-killing effects of mango polyphenols are specific to cancer cells, where inflammation was reduced in both cancer and non-cancer cells, seemingly through the involvement of miRNA-21 – short microRNA molecules associated with cancer,” Talcott said. A second study by this research group using hairless mice showed mango polyphenols also suppressed cell proliferation in the breast cancer BT474 cell line and tumor growth in mice with human breast carcinoma cells transplanted into them.

(Next)

Ginseng can treat and prevent influenza and RSV, researcher finds

Georgia State University

Ginseng can help treat and prevent influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a respiratory virus that infects the lungs and breathing passages, according to research findings by a scientist in Georgia State University’s new Institute for Biomedical Sciences. In a recent issue of Nutrients and an upcoming publication of the International Journal of Molecular Medicine, Sang-Moo Kang reports the beneficial effects of ginseng, a well-known herbal medicine, on human health. He partnered with a university and research institutes in South Korea that wanted international collaborative projects to study if ginseng can be used to improve health and protect against disease because of the potential benefit in fighting these viruses. There are no vaccines available for RSV, which affects millions and is the leading cause of inflammatory bronchiolitis pneumonia and viral death in infants and in some elderly adults. In his study published in Nutrients, Kang investigated whether red ginseng extract has preventive effects on influenza A virus infection. He found that red ginseng extract improves the survival of human lung epithelial cells infected with influenza virus. Also, treatment with red ginseng extract reduced the expression of genes that cause inflammation.

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New study illustrates that potato protein ingestion strongly increases muscle protein synthesis rates at rest and during recovery from exercise

Maastricht University, The Netherlands

Exercise enthusiasts have long presumed animal protein to be superior to plant-derived options for muscle protein synthesis due to its essential amino acid profile. While many plant proteins are deficient in one or more essential amino acids necessary for optimal muscle growth and repair, a new randomized controlled study published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise shows that plant-derived proteins can still induce strong anabolic responses. Researchers at Maastricht University, The Netherlands, found that consuming 30 grams of potato-derived protein concentrate following resistance exercise strongly increased muscle protein synthesis rates to levels that did not differ from the response following the ingestion of an equivalent amount of milk protein concentrate. In general, plant-derived proteins are considered to have lesser anabolic properties, due to their lower digestibility and incomplete amino acid profile. The results show that ingestion of 30 g potato-derived protein will support muscle growth and repair at rest and during recovery from exercise.”

(Next)

Antipsychotic medication during pregnancy does affect babies

Monash University (Australia) 

A seven-year study of women who take antipsychotic medication while pregnant, proves it can affect babies. The observational study, published in the journal PLOS ONE, reveals that whilst most women gave birth to healthy babies, the use of mood stabilisers or higher doses of antipsychotics during pregnancy increased the need for special care after birth with 43 per cent of babies placed in a Special Care Nursery (SCN) or a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU), almost three times the national rate in Australia. As well as an increased likelihood of the need for intensive care, the world-first study shows antipsychotic drugs affects babies in other ways; 18 per cent were born prematurely, 37 per cent showed signs of respiratory distress and 15 per cent developed withdrawal symptoms.

The Gary Null Show - 06.06.22

The Gary Null Show - 06.06.22

June 6, 2022

The Gary Null Show Notes – 06.06.22

Videos:

1. Pay Attention & Listen Closely To What Klaus Schwab & Yuval Noah Harari Has To Say About Their Agenda.
2.  World Economic Forum – Hackable Humans – Yuval Noah Harari,
3. WEF – Anything Will Be Put in A Body  (1:24)
4.  Bill Gates – ” We didn’t understand that it’s a fairly low fatality rate”
5. The Hacking of the American Mind with Dr. Robert Lustig ( Start @ 0:36)
6. “Uniquely Stupid:” Dissecting the Past Decade of American Life | Amanpour and Company (18:09)
7. Lara Logan Rapid Fires Truth Bombs On Ukraine Propaganda & The Democrat Narratives Of The Day (2:57)
8. You’re Not Going To Believe What I’m About To Tell You – The Oatmeal (7:53)

Beetroot-hawthorn berry blend may boost heart health

University of Texas, May 27, 2022

A blend of beetroot and Hawthorn berry may boost the activity of an enzyme linked to improved heart health, suggests a new study from Texas. Researchers from the University of Texas report that the herbal blend could improve the status of nitric oxide in the body – nitric oxide (NO) is a potent vasodilator, or compound that promotes the dilation or relaxation of blood vessels, thereby easing blood pressure and boosting heart health. “The strategy of formulating a combination of natural products and botanicals chosen specifically for their NO activity shows promise in restoring NO [control] in human subjects at risk for cardiovascular disease for use as a dietary supplement,” wrote researchers in Nutrition Research. Dr Bryan explained what makes the combination unique is beet root and hawthorn play a unique and critical role.” Beetroot was chosen because it was found to contain high levels of nitrate, while hawthorn berries have a high activity of the enzyme nitrite reductase, which converts nitrite to nitric oxide.

(Next)

Vitamin D needed for male fertility

Copenhagen University Hospital

The journal Human Reproduction reported the finding of Danish researchers of a role for vitamin D in sperm motility:  the movement of spermatozoa that is necessary for fertilization. Martin Blomberg Jensen of Copenhagen University Hospital and his associates evaluated motility in sperm samples from 300 Danish men.  Blood samples were analyzed for 25-hydroxyvitamin D, parathyroid hormone and other factors. Forty-four percent of the subjects were found to have insufficient vitamin D levels, which were inversely correlated with parathyroid hormone.   Increasing vitamin D levels were associated with greater sperm motility as well increased progressive motility, which is the highest grade of sperm motility, applied to sperm that swim rapidly in a straight line. In an in vitro experiment utilizing sperm samples donated by 40 men, vitamin D3 was demonstrated to increase intracellular calcium via vitamin D receptor-mediated calcium release, improve sperm motility, and induce the acrosome reaction, which is needed for fertilization of the ovum. “Our study uncovers some of the functions of vitamin D and generates new hypotheses. This is an intriguing finding, because it suggests that vitamin D has an effect on sperm movement and function.”

(Next) 

Aromatherapy can reduce post-surgical opioid use by half, preliminary US study finds

University of Pittsburgh

Aromatherapy reduces post-surgical opioid use by half in hip replacement patients anxious before their operation, according to a new preliminary study being presented at the annual meeting of the European Society of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care (ESAIC) in Milan. Previous research has shown that anxiety, depression and catastrophising (patients who believe they are going to die during surgery) increase post-operative pain and opioid use by up to 50%. Aromatherapy, the use of essential oils to enhance wellbeing, has been used for thousands of years and a number of recent studies have found that lavender and peppermint aromatherapy, in particular, can reduce anxiety.1 Participants are randomised to an active treatment (aromatherapy) or placebo group. Those in the active treatment group are given a lavender and peppermint “aromatab”, an adhesive patch that slowly releases essential oils when stuck onto clothes, skin or a hospital gown, to wear from at least an hour before their operation. The patches are changed every 12 hours and are worn for 72 hours after surgery. Those in the placebo group wear a patch which emits sweet almond oil – an oil not credited with anxiety-lowering qualities. Total opioid use in the first 48 hours after surgery was 50% lower in the aromatherapy group (12 OME) than in the placebo group (24.75 OME).  (OME, oral morphine equivalent, is a measure that allows comparison between different drugs and methods of administration).

(Next)

Coffee consumption link to reduced risk of acute kidney injury, study finds

Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

If you need another reason to start the day drinking a cup of joe, a recent study by Johns Hopkins Medicine researchers has revealed that consuming at least one cup of coffee a day may reduce the risk of acute kidney injury (AKI) when compared to those who do not drink coffee. The findings, published in the journal Kidney International Reports, show that those who drank any quantity of coffee every day had a 15% lower risk of AKI, with the largest reductions observed in the group that drank two to three cups a day (a 22%–23% lower risk).

The Gary Null Show - 06.03.22

The Gary Null Show - 06.03.22

June 3, 2022

Videos:

1.  World Economic Forum – Hackable Humans – Yuval Noah Harari,
2.  Introducing The Reset: The Great Reset Docuseries (start @ 11:00)
3. Lara Logan Rapid Fires Truth Bombs On Ukraine Propaganda & The Democrat Narratives Of The Day (2:57)
4 .Kissinger: China, US Should Work Together to Understand, Respect Each Other’s Core Interests (3:14)
5. Tipping Point – The Risks of Pfizer’s Vaccine to Unborn Babies – with Naomi Wolf (start at 1.48)
6.  Good news! WHO Pandemic ‘Treaty’ voted down (6:09)
7. Gravitas: Is climate activism becoming a nuisance to society? (4:32)
8. Why Asia Pacific Chose China (You Won’t Believe What America Did) – Cyrus Janssen (10:37)

Study confirms benefit of supplements for slowing age-related macular degeneration

National Eye Institute, June 2

The Age-Related Eye Disease Studies (AREDS and AREDS2) established that dietary supplements can slow progression of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common cause of blindness in older Americans. In a new report, scientists analyzed 10 years of AREDS2 data. They show that the AREDS2 formula, which substituted antioxidants lutein and zeaxanthin for beta-carotene, not only reduces risk of lung cancer due to beta-carotene, but is also more effective at reducing risk of AMD progression, compared to the original formula. “Because beta-carotene increased the risk of lung cancer for current smokers in two NIH-supported studies, our goal with AREDS2 was to create an equally effective supplement formula that could be used by anyone, whether or not they smoke,” said Emily Chew, M.D., at the National Eye Institute (NEI).” In AREDS2, begun in 2006, Chew and colleagues compared the beta-carotene formulation to one with 10 mg lutein and 2 mg zeaxanthin instead. Like beta-carotene, lutein and zeaxanthin are antioxidants with activity in the retina. The beta-carotene-containing formation was only given to participants who had never smoked or who had quit smoking. At the end of the five-year AREDS2 study period, the researchers concluded that lutein and zeaxanthin did not increase risk for lung cancer, and that the new formation could reduce the risk of AMD progression by about 26%.

(NEXT)

Exercise amplifies immune attack on pancreatic cancer

New York University Langone Health, June 2

Aerobic exercise reprograms the immune system to reduce pancreatic tumor growth and amplify the effects of immunotherapy, a new study finds. Published online in Cancer Cell, the study provides new insight into how the mammalian immune system, designed to attack foreign invaders like bacteria, can also recognize cancer cells as abnormal. Exercise-induced increases in levels of the hormone adrenalin cause changes to the immune system, say the study authors, including in the activity of cells that respond to signaling protein interleukin-15 (IL-15). The current study found that exercise promotes the survival of CD8 T cells sensitive to IL-15, and doubles the number of them homing to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) tumors in mice. Such “effector” T cells have been shown by other studies to be capable of killing cancer cells. Other tests found that aerobic exercise for 30 minutes five times a week reduced the rate of cancer formation by 50 percent in one mouse model of PDAC, and reduced tumor weight by 25 percent in another model, in which mice ran on treadmills for three weeks. Our findings show, for the first time, how aerobic exercise affects the immune microenvironment within pancreatic tumors,” says first author Emma Kurz, MD, Ph.D., at NYU Grossman School of Medicine’s Vilcek Institute of Graduate Biomedical Sciences.

(NEXT)

Antibiotics wreak havoc on athletic performance

University of California at Riverside, June 1

New research demonstrates that by killing essential gut bacteria, antibiotics ravage athletes’ motivation and endurance. The UC Riverside-led mouse study suggests the microbiome is a big factor separating athletes from couch potatoes. Other studies have examined the way that exercise affects the microbiome, but this study is one of few to examine the reverse — how gut bacteria also impact voluntary exercise behaviors. Voluntary exercise involves both motivation and athletic ability. Researchers confirmed through fecal samples that after 10 days of antibiotics, gut bacteria were reduced in two groups of mice: some bred for high levels of running, and some that were not. So, when wheel running in the athletic mice was reduced by 21 percent, researchers were certain the microbiome damage was responsible. In addition, the high runner mice did not recover their running behavior even 12 days after the antibiotic treatment stopped.

(NEXT)

Study: Trans Fat Hides in at Least a Quarter of Supermarket Foods

Environmental Working Group, May 22

A new analysis  by Environmental Working Group has found that harmful artificial trans fatty acids lurk in more than 27 percent of more than 84,000 processed foods common in American supermarkets.  Another 10 percent contain ingredients likely to contain trans fat. EWG analysts used information from EWG’s Food Scores database and mobile app  to determine which foods contained partially hydrogenated oils and other trans fat containing-ingredients. The interactive, searchable tool rates more than 84,000 foods and 5,000 ingredients based on nutrition, ingredient and processing concerns. In most cases, the products’ trans fat content on the nutrition label doesn’t add up. The reason: an obscure loophole in federal food labeling regulations that allows food processors to round off less than half a gram of trans fat per serving to zero. A single serving of more than 400 foods in the Food Scores database contained enough trans fat to exceed the World Health Organization’s recommended limit of less than 2 grams per day for an adult who consumed a 2,000 calorie diet, the analysis said.

(NEXT)

Coffee drinking again linked with longer life

Jinan University (China), June 1 2022. 

Yet another study has found an association between coffee drinking and a lower risk of premature mortality. The research was reported n the Annals of Internal Medicine. The investigation included 171,616 men and women who did not have cancer or heart disease upon enrollment between 2006 to 2010 in the UK Biobank prospective cohort study. Participants were 37 to 73 years old at recruitment. During a 7-year median follow-up period, participants who consumed unsweetened coffee had up to a 29% lower risk of death (which was associated with drinking 2.5 to 4.5 cups per day) compared to those who did not drink coffee. Participants who drank sugar-sweetened coffee had up to a 31% lower risk, associated with consuming 1.5 to 2.5 cups per day. The association between artificially sweetened coffee and mortality risk was inconclusive. “This prospective analysis found that moderate consumption of unsweetened coffee and that of sugar-sweetened coffee were associated with similar reductions in risk for all-cause, cancer-related, and cardiovascular disease-related mortality,” authors Dan Liu, MD, of Jinan University and colleagues concluded.

The Gary Null Show - 06.02.22

The Gary Null Show - 06.02.22

June 2, 2022

Videos :

1. Introducing The Reset: The Great Reset Docuseries (Start @ 0:30)
2. Welcome to 2030 this is agenda for humans
3. WEF – Anything Will Be Put in A Body  (1:24)
4. The social contract has been broken by the few of the State, says Neil Oliver (9:35)
5. Fake Meat, Fake Breastmilk and Food Shortages – Allison Royal (11:38)
6. Good news! WHO Pandemic ‘Treaty’ voted down (6:09)
7. Carl Sagan’s views about science (1:22)
8. How to speak Bidenese – by:  Not the Bee  (3:04)

Vegan diet might ease diabetic nerve pain

Lenox Hill Hospital (NYC), May 28th, 2022 

A vegan diet might help people with diabetes-related nerve damage shed weight and find some pain relief, a small pilot study suggests. In the new study, researchers tested whether a vegan diet could help people with type 2 diabetes and painful nerve damage in their feet or hands. The investigators found that over 20 weeks, the 17 people they assigned to the diet lost an average of 15 pounds. At the same time, blood flow to their feet improved and their pain eased up. The dieters were told to limit themselves to 20 to 30 grams of fat per day, and to load up on “low GI” foods, which are foods that do not cause a large surge in blood sugar. Breakfast might include oatmeal with raisins, Wells said, while dinner could be lentil stew, or a vegetable stir-fry with rice.  After about five months, the vegan group had lost 15 pounds, on average, versus about 1 pound in the comparison group. They also reported bigger improvements on a standard pain-rating survey.

(Next)

About 3 grams a day of omega-3 fatty acids may lower blood pressure, more research needed 

Macau University of Science and Technology (China)

About 3 grams daily of omega-3 fatty acids, consumed in foods or supplements, appears to be the optimal daily dose to help lower blood pressure, according to a research review published today in the Journal of the American Heart Association, an open access, peer-reviewed journal of the American Heart Association. According to our research, the average adult may have a modest blood pressure reduction from consuming about 3 grams a day of these fatty acids,” said study author Xinzhi Li, M.D., Ph.D., at Macau University of Science and Technology in Macau, China. Researchers analyzed the results of 71 clinical trials from around the world published from 1987 to 2020.  The analysis found: Compared to adults who did not consume EPA and DHA, those who consumed between 2 and 3 grams daily of combined DHA and EPA omega-3 fatty acids (in supplements, food or both) had reduced systolic (top number) and diastolic (bottom number) blood pressure by an average 2 mm Hg. Consuming more than 3 grams of omega-3 fatty acids daily may have added blood pressure-lowering benefit for adults with high blood pressure or high blood lipids: At 3g a day of omega-3s, systolic blood pressure (SBP) decreased an average of 4.5 mm Hg for those with hypertension, and about 2 mm Hg on average for those without. At 5g a day of omega-3s, SBP declined an average of nearly 4 mm Hg for those with hypertension and less than 1 mm Hg on average for those without.

(Next)

When is the best time of day to exercise? The answer may be different for men and women

Skidmore College

When should I fit exercise within my daily schedule? For most, the answer depends on our family’s schedule and working hours, and perhaps on whether we’re “larks” or “night owls.” But over the past decade, researchers have found that much more hangs on this question than these constraints. That’s because recent findings suggest that the effectiveness of exercise depends on the time of day (Exercise Time Of Day, ETOD). Now, a randomized controlled trial not only confirms convincingly that ETOD affects the effectiveness of exercise, but also shows that these effects differ between types of exercise, and between women and men. Principal investigator Dr. Paul J Arciero, a professor at the Health and Human Physiological Sciences Department  said: “Here we show for the first time that for women, exercise during the morning reduces belly fat and blood pressure, whereas evening exercise in women increases upper body muscular strength, power, and endurance, and improves overall mood and nutritional satiety.”

(Next)

Diabetes may weaken teeth and promote tooth decay

Rutgers University, May 31, 2022

People with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes are prone to tooth decay, and a new study from Rutgers may explain why: reduced strength and durability of enamel and dentin, the hard substance under enamel that gives structure to teeth. Researchers induced Type 1 diabetes in 35 mice and used a Vickers microhardness tester to compare their teeth with those of 35 healthy controls over 28 weeks. Although the two groups started with comparable teeth, enamel grew significantly softer in the diabetic mice after 12 weeks, and the gap continued to widen throughout the study. Significant differences in dentin microhardness arose by week 28.

(Next)

Could beating drums help beat autism?

King’s College London, June 1, 2022

The percussive skill needed to bang out rhythms on a drum may help improve socializing, inhibition control and focus among teens with autism, new research suggest The finding follows work with 36 teens with an autism spectrum disorder. Half were randomly chosen to receive two months’ worth of drum training, based on a standard electronic drum kit program. The upshot: Learning to drum appeared to reduce hyperactive behavior and improve teens’ ability to focus and pay attention, she said. The activity also seemed to enhance communication “between brain regions responsible for inhibitory control, action-outcome monitoring, and self-regulation.” Drumming requires “motor planning and timing accuracy” as well as focused attention and inhibition control.  Those assigned to drum training were given two 45-minute sessions a week for eight weeks. The other group received no drum training.The findings were published online May 31 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

The Gary Null Show - 06.01.22

The Gary Null Show - 06.01.22

June 1, 2022

Videos:

1. Matt Taibbi – Shouldn’t Hillary Clinton Be Banned From Twitter Now? (Read)
2. Parents Talking To The School Board, About Filth in Schoolbooks (4:55)
3. Journalist Dr Udo Ulfkotte was paid to spread propaganda and push for war with Russia! (13:22)
4. Eugenics and America’s Campaign to Create a Master Race: War Against the Weak (2003) (Start at 3:00, Play For 15 mins)
5. World Economic Forum – Hackable Humans – Yuval Noah Harari,
6. Bill Gates – ” We didn’t understand that it’s a fairly low fatality rate”

Vitamin D may restore the body’s natural barrier against ovarian cancer

Nagoya University (Japan)

Ovarian cancer has one of the highest death rates of all cancers. One reason for this is that the cancer turns the body’s defenses against itself. However, new research from Nagoya University published in Matrix Biology suggests that vitamin D can effectively prevent one of the key pathways used by this cancer. Ovarian cancer often undergoes a process called peritoneal metastasis. In this process, its cells detach from their primary site in the ovary and travel to a secondary implantation site, such as the peritoneal wall or diaphragm. The peritoneum defends against this process using a barrier consisting of mesothelial cells, which prevent the adhesion of cancer cells and limit their spread. However, ovarian cancer gets around this defense by transforming the protective mesothelial cells into cancer-associated mesothelial cells. This creates an environment that helps metastasis, assisting the spread of cancer around the body.

(Next)

Herbal supplement shows promise against lung cancer

University of Technology at Sydney

Berberine, a natural compound found in plants such as barberry and goldenseal, suppresses the proliferation of lung cancer cells in the lab, new research shows. It also reduces airway inflammation and damage to healthy lung cells exposed to chemicals from cigarette smoke. The evaluation of berberine’s effect on non-small cell lung cancer has just been published in the journal Pharmaceutics. It shows that berberine exhibits potent anticancer activity, suppressing cancer cell growth in vitro. The study follows research recently published in Antioxidants, also led by Dr. Dua, showing berberine can inhibit oxidative stress, and reduce inflammation and cellular senescence induced by cigarette smoke extract in lab-grown human healthy lung cells.

(Next)

N-acetylcysteine could improve concussion recovery

Midwestern University (Arizona)

A study reported on April 8, 2022, in The Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery revealed improvement in symptoms of concussion among older men and women with mild traumatic brain injury (TBI) who received supplements containing the antioxidant amino acid N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Free radicals produced following brain injury react with lipids to create toxic molecules within the first hours following a traumatic brain injury. Dr McPherson and his associates suggested that the damage caused by these molecules could be responsible for the symptoms that occur after a concussion and that the use of compounds such as NAC could help mitigate some of these symptoms. The study included 65 traumatic brain injury patients of an average age of 76 years who were within three hours of trauma surgery service evaluation. Thirty-four patients received standard treatments for TBI plus 4 grams NAC within three hours of injury, followed by a 3-day period during which 2 grams NAC was administered twice per day and an additional 3 days during which 1.5 grams NAC was provided twice daily. The remainder of the participants received standard treatment alone. Questionnaires that evaluated post-concussion symptoms were administered at the beginning of the study and at 7 and 30 days. Questionnaire scores were significantly better in the NAC group on days 7 and 30.

(Next)

Ozone antiseptic shows potential for treating severe gum infections

Research SEA (Japan)

A powerful new antiseptic agent, called ozone nanobubble water, holds promise for the treatment of periodontitis, or severe gum infections, according to research published in the journal Science and Technology of Advanced Materials. The study, by Professor Shinichi Arakawa and colleagues, evaluated the bactericidal activities of ozone nano-bubble water — also known as NBW3 — against the two main bacterial agents that cause periodontitis. It also assessed NBW3’s toxicity to human oral tissue cells. Their results showed that NBW3 can kill periodontal pathogens within 30 seconds of exposure, yet has only a minor impact on the viability of oral tissue cells after 24 hours of exposure. Based on their in vitro results, the researchers conclude that NBW3 could become a valuable tool for treating periodontitis.

(Next)

Eating a Mediterranean diet could cut womb cancer risk

Institute of Pharmacological Research (Italy)

Women who eat a Mediterranean diet could cut their risk of womb cancer by more than half (57 per cent), according to a study published in the British Journal of Cancer*. The Italian researchers looked at the diets of over 5,000 Italian women to see how closely they stuck to a Mediterranean diet and whether they went on to develop womb cancer**. The team broke the Mediterranean diet down into nine different components and measured how closely women stuck to them. The diet includes eating lots of vegetables, fruits and nuts, pulses, cereals and potatoes, fish, monounsaturated fats but little meat, milk and other dairy products and moderate alcohol intake. Researchers found that women who adhered to the Mediterranean diet most closely by eating between seven and nine of the beneficial food groups lowered their risk of womb cancer by more than half (57 per cent). Those who stuck to six elements of the diet’s components reduced their risk of womb cancer by 46 per cent and those who stuck to five reduced their risk by a third (34 per cent). But those women whose diet included fewer than five of the components did not lower their risk of womb cancer significantly.

The Gary Null Show - 05.31.22

The Gary Null Show - 05.31.22

May 31, 2022

Videos:

 
 

Regular chocolate consumption may be linked to lower risk of heart flutter

Harvard and Alborg (Denmark) universities,

Regular chocolate consumption may be linked to a lower risk of developing the heart rhythm irregularity atrial fibrillation, also known as heart flutter, finds research published online in the journal Heart. The associations seemed to be strongest for 1 weekly serving for women and between 2 and 6 weekly servings for men, the findings suggest. They drew on 55,502 (26,400 men and 29,100 women) participants, aged between 50 and 64, from the population-based Danish Diet, Cancer and Health Study. Participants provided information on their usual weekly chocolate consumption, with one serving classified as 1 ounce (30 g). But they were not asked to specify which type of chocolate they ate. Most chocolate eaten in Denmark, however, is milk chocolate (minimum 30 per cent cocoa solids). When the data were analysed by sex, the incidence of atrial fibrillation was lower among women than among men irrespective of intake, but the associations between higher chocolate intake and lower risk of heart flutter remained even after accounting for potentially influential factors. The strongest association for women seemed to be 1 weekly serving of chocolate (21 per cent lower risk), while for men, it was 2 to 6 weekly servings (23 per cent lower risk).

(NEXT)

Fruit and vegetable consumption and risk of lung cancer

Qingdao University (China)

According to news reporting originating in Shandong, People's Republic of China, A meta-analysis was conducted to summarize evidence from prospective cohort studies about the association of fruit and vegetable consumption with the risk of lung cancer. A random-effects model was used to combine study-specific relative risks and 95% confidence interval. Dose-response relationship was assessed by restricted cubic spline. The RR (95% CI) of lung cancer for highest versus lowest category of fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption was 0.87 (8 studies including 12,942 cases among 1,571,494 subjects), and the effect was 0.84 for fruit (16 studies including 15,421 cases among 1,791,469 subjects) and 0.90 for vegetable (19 studies including 16,422 cases among 1,877,375 subjects).

(NEXT)

Going For A 10-Minute Power Walk Every Day Could Be Secret To Long Life

National Cancer Institute

Could a 10-minute power walk every day could add years to your life? A recent study of nearly 5,000 older adults found that deaths fell as physical activity increased. Just 10, 20, or 30 minutes extra exercise a day per day reduced annual mortality rates by seven, 13 and 17 percent respectively. The research is based on Americans aged 40 to 85 who wore accelerometers on their waist for a week. Volunteers were tracked for an average of ten years, during which time 1,165 deaths occurred. The study shows that adding 10 minutes of physical activity each day resulted in an estimated 111,174 preventable deaths per year. Not surprisingly, the more physical activity, the more deaths prevented. The number almost doubled and tripled to 209,459 and 367,037, respectively, for 20 and 30 minutes. Similar results were observed for men and women, including those of all ethnic backgrounds.

(NEXT)

Whey protein improves blood glucose in diabetics

Newcastle University (UK),

A study reported in BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care resulted in improved glucose control among people with type 2 diabetes who consumed whey protein. The crossover study included 18 type 2 diabetic men and women who received a drink that contained 15 grams of whey protein or a protein-depleted placebo to be consumed 10 minutes before breakfast, lunch and dinner for 7 days. This was followed by a 2-week period during which no treatments were given. Participants who had previously received whey were then given a placebo and those who received the placebo were given whey for an additional 7 days. Continuous glucose monitoring revealed improved daily blood glucose levels in association with whey intake. Participants experienced an increase of 2 hours per day of normal glucose during the week in which whey was consumed in comparison with the week in which the placebo was administered.

The Gary Null Show - 05.26.22

The Gary Null Show - 05.26.22

May 26, 2022

Videos:

1.  Klaus Schwab — A Conversation With Albert Bourla, CEO of Pfizer (play 3:00 mins)
2. Ft. Daniel Nolan – Speaking about misinformation and Truth  (19:00)
3. This Western priest can afford to speak frankly. He has nothing to lose and no one to fear (2:29)
4. You heard it from Mr Twitter himself – Elon Musk (0:43)
5. FDA Limits J&J Vaccine “Trust the science “ – ABC News Clip (0:27)
6. What is Monkeypox and Was It Planned For A Year Ago – Ben Swann (6:34)
7. Ivory Hecker – Americans are done panicking about viruses.
8. Bill Gates – ” We didn’t understand that it’s a fairly low fatality rate” (0:30)

Articles of Interest:

FBI Conducted Potentially Millions of Searches of Americans’ Data Last Year, Report Says

I FOUND IT!!! Why do Ukrainians tie people to poles?

Antioxidant-rich grape powder protects brain from damage caused by high fat and high sugar diets: Study

Taipei Medical University (Taiwan), May 17, 2022

Antioxidants from grape powder helped ease hyperglycaemia-related cognitive dysfunction in aged rats, a study discovered.

Researchers from the Taipei Medical University said polyphenols from grape powder produced antioxidative and blood sugar-lowering properties that reduced the damage caused by a high-fat-high-fructose (HFHF) diet.

Findings revealed that 6% grape powder group had reduced RAGE, or receptor for advanced glycation end products in the brain tissue.

“Inclusion of up to 6% grape powder in the diet markedly reduced RAGE expression and tau hyperphosphorylation, but upregulated the expression of Nrf2 and BDNF, as well as the phosphorylation of PI3K and ERK, in the brain tissues of aged rats fed the HFHF diet,” the researchers reported.

Thus, while long-term diet high in fructose and fat levels can cause hyperglycemia-related cognitive dysfunction in aged rats, grape powder supplementation can help ease the damaging changes in the brain protein related to neurodegeneration.

Excessive degradation of mitochondria is the tipping point from normal alcohol metabolism to alcoholic liver disease

Medical University of South Carolina, May 24, 2022

While most commonly known as “the powerhouses of the cell” because of their energy producing capabilities, mitochondria also play important roles in regulating the health of cells. These important structures can be damaged by alcohol consumption, which can cause them to rupture and release their DNA, proteins and lipids, collectively known as “damage associated molecular patterns (DAMPs).”

To understand more fully how alcohol damages mitochondria, and how this leads to mitophagy, researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) used an advanced imaging technique to investigate changes in mitochondrial function within the livers of mice that were exposed to alcohol. Their findings, published online on March 16 in the journal Autophagy, demonstrated that exposure to alcohol causes a specific type of mitochondrial damage called depolarization. In a completely novel discovery, they found that it is this depolarization that indicates to the cell that the mitochondria are damaged and thereby causes activation of the mitophagy machinery to remove the damaged mitochondria before they can cause harm.

The current study determined that mitochondrial injury, specifically depolarization, initiates mitophagy to prevent damaged mitochondria from accumulating in cells. Blocking depolarization after ethanol exposure also blocks mitophagy, preventing mitochondrial depletion.

Flavonoids may slow lung function decline due to aging

Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, May 22, 2022

Previous research has shown that the plant-produced chemicals known as flavonoids have beneficial antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Anthocyanins, the type of flavonoid investigated in the current study, have been detected in lung tissue shortly after being ingested, and in animals models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The plant chemicals appear to reduce mucus and inflammatory secretions.

The researchers analyzed data from 463 adults (average age: 44) who participated in the second and third European Community Respiratory Health Surveys from 2002 to 2012.  The researchers also analyzed the association between anthocyanin consumption and lung function in smokers, those who had never smoked and those who quit. The association between high consumption of the flavonoids and reduced lung function decline appeared to be stronger among both never smokers and those who had quit than in the general study population. Among smokers, the study did not find an association between anthocyanin intake and lung function.

“Our study suggests that the general population could benefit from consuming more fruits rich in these flavonoids like berries, particularly those who have given up smoking or have never smoked, Dr. Larsen said. 

Medication doesn’t help kids with ADHD learn, study finds

Florida International University, May 24, 2022

For decades, most physicians, parents and teachers have believed that stimulant medications help children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) learn. However, in the first study of its kind, researchers found medication has no detectable impact on how much children with ADHD learn in the classroom.

Approximately 10% of children in the U.S. are diagnosed with ADHD and more than 90% of them are prescribed stimulant medication as the main form of treatment in school settingsbecause most physicians believe that medication will result in better academic achievement.

Researchers evaluated 173 children between the ages of 7 and 12 with ADHD participating in the center’s Summer Treatment Program, a comprehensive eight-week summer camp program for children with ADHD and related behavioral, emotional and learning challenges.  Each child was randomized to be medicated with a sustained-release stimulant medication during either the first or second of the instructional phases, receiving a placebo during the other.

Contrary to expectations, researchers found that children learned the same amount of science, social studies, and vocabulary content whether they were taking the medication or the placebo.

Mediterranean diet may blunt air pollution’s ill health effects

NYU School of Medicine May 21, 2022

Eating a Mediterranean diet may protect people from some of the harm of long-term exposure to air pollution, and reduce their risk of dying from heart attacks, stroke and other causes of death, according to new research.

The researchers analyzed data from the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-American Association of Retired Persons (AARP) Diet and Health Study. Over 17 years, the study followed 548,699 people (average age 62 at enrollment) from 6 states. During that time, 126,835 people in the study group died.

The researchers created five groups of participants based on their level of adherence to a Mediterranean diet and linked participants to estimates of long-term exposure to fine particulate matter (PM2.5), nitrous oxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) based on census tract information.

When comparing those least and most adherent to a Mediterranean diet, the study found that:

  • Deaths from all causes increased by 5 percent for every 10 parts per billion (ppb) increase in long-term average NO2 exposure in those least adherent, compared to 2 percent among the most adherent.
  • Cardiovascular disease deaths increased by 17 percent for every 10 micrograms per cubic meter (μg/m3) increase in long-term average PM2.5 exposure in those least adherent, compared to 5 percent among the most adherent.
  • Cardiovascular disease deaths increased by 10 percent for every 10 ppb increase in NO2. exposure in those least adherent, compared to 2 percent among the most adherent.
  • Heart attack deaths increased by 20 percent for every 10 μg/m3 increase in PM2.5 exposure in those least adherent, compared to 5 percent among the most adherent.
  • Heart attack deaths increased by 12 percent for every single ppb increase in NO2 exposure in those least adherent, compared to 4 percent among the most adherent.

Why blueberries are an effective weapon in the war against Alzheimer’s disease University of Cincinnati,  May 21, 2022 Could a plump, little blueberry really hold colossal promise in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease? New research adds to the growing evidence that blueberries, bursting with antioxidants, could help diminish the devastating defects of dementia.
Newly released study findings show that certain flavonoids found in blueberries could also hold the key to lessening the effects of Alzheimer’s disease.
The researchers, led by Krikorian, believe that blueberries’ beneficial effects against Alzheimer’s could be due to certain flavonoids found in the berries. Known as anthocyanins, they have been shown to improve cognition in tests with animals.
Those receiving the blueberry powder were found to exhibit improved brain function and cognitive performance compared to those in the control group, with better memory and improved access to words and concepts.  In another study, 94 people, aged 62 to 80, were divided into four groups. The subjects did not have diagnosed early-onset Alzheimer’s, but did report feelings of having their memory decline.

The Gary Null Show - 05.25.22

The Gary Null Show - 05.25.22

May 25, 2022

Broccoli may beneficially affect microbiota diversity: Study

University of Illinois

Consuming broccoli may change the diversity and composition of the microbiota in the gastrointestinal tract, says a new study.

Two hundred grams per day of broccoli for 17 days resulted in 37% increase in the proportion of Bacteroidetes relative to Firmicutes, according to data presented at the Experimental Biology meeting in Chicago this week by scientists from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, ARS-USDA, and the National Cancer Institute.

“These novel results reveal that broccoli consumption affects the diversity and composition of the GI microbiota of healthy adults,” they wrote in the FASEB Journal “These data help fill the gap in knowledge related to the role of bacterial hydrolysis of phytonutrients.

“The increase in Bacteroides spp. is particularly relevant because Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron has been shown in vitro to utilize glucosinolates.”

 

Acupuncture possible treatment for dental anxiety

University of York

Researchers have found evidence that acupuncture could help people who experience dental anxiety.

Dental anxiety affects up to an estimated 30% of the adult population in countries world-wide. Patients can experience nausea, difficulty breathing and dizziness at the thought of going to the dentist, during an examination, and following treatment.

In a review of six trials with 800 patients, researchers used a points scale to measure anxiety and studies show that anxiety reduced by eight points when dental patients were given acupuncture as a treatment. This level of reduction is considered to be clinically relevant, which means that acupuncture could be a possibility for tackling dental anxiety.

Studies that compared anxiety levels between patients that received acupuncture and those that did not, showed a significant difference in anxiety scores during dental treatment. A clinically relevant reduction in anxiety was found when acupuncture was compared with not receiving acupuncture.

 

Omega-3 may help protect against adverse cardiovascular effects of pollution

Case Western University

An article published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology reported a protective effect for supplementation with omega-3 fatty acids against some of the harmful cardiovascular effects of exposure to air pollution in China.

The randomized, double-blinded trial included 65 healthy college students in Shanghai, China who received 2.5 grams fish oil as a source of omega-3 fatty acids or a placebo daily. During the last two months of the trial, the subjects participated in four health examinations that included blood pressure assessment and measurement of blood markers of inflammation, coagulation, endothelial function, oxidative stress, antioxidant activity, cardiometabolism and neuroendocrine stress response.

Campus levels of fine particulate matter air pollution (PM 2.5) measured during the course of the trial averaged 38 micrograms per cubic meter. The researchers observed greater stability of most biomarker levels in responses to changes in fine particulate matter exposure in the fish oil-treated group in comparison with the placebo group. Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation was associated with beneficial effects for five blood biomarkers of inflammation, coagulation, endothelial function, oxidative stress, and neuroendocrine stress response. 

 

 

Snoring causes injuries and prevention of healing in the upper airways

Umea University (Sweden)

The recurrent vibrations caused by snoring can lead to injuries in the upper airways of people who snore heavily. This in turn, can cause swallowing dysfunction and render individuals more vulnerable for developing the severe condition obstructive sleep apnea. These findings are reported by researchers at Umeå University, Sweden. Their on-going research focuses on the processes behind vibratory damage and healing of the upper airway tract. The data generated will help identify people at high risk of developing sleep apnea and to find novel treatment strategies.

Researchers in Umeå have shown that snorers and sleep apnea patients have neuromuscular injuries in the upper respiratory tract. The injuries can be seen at both the structural and molecular level. Researchers could also observe a correlation between snoring and swallowing dysfunction as well as a relation between nerve damage and obstructive sleep apnea. Sleep apnea is characterized by repeated collapse of the upper respiratory tract leading to respiratory arrest during sleep, which increases the risk of cardiovascular disease.

The studies show that people who constantly snore heavily and have sleep apnea displayed a loss of nerves and muscle mass in the soft palate. Furthermore, the attempts by the body to heal damaged tissue were disturbed resulting in an abnormal muscle structure. Another interesting finding was that muscle fibres in the soft palate lacked or had a disturbed organization of certain structural proteins. These proteins stabilize the organelles of the muscle cell and support cellular structures related to energy production and muscle fibre contraction.

The researchers also found that a neurotransmitter that is normally associated with healing and regeneration of neurons was present in the muscle cells. This finding suggests that the body is trying to heal the injuries, but the recurrent snoring vibrations prevent proper healing. It becomes a vicious circle where snoring causes damage and at the same time disturb healing of injuries, which can lead to swallowing dysfunction and sleep apnea.

 

Study: Tai chi can reduce hypertension symptoms in young and middle-aged in-service staff

Zhei-jian Hospital (China)

Researchers from Zhejiang Hospital in China reported that practicing t’ai chi can help with hypertension. 

  • The treatment group practiced simplified t’ai chi for three months. On the other hand, the control group underwent general daily lifestyle intervention.
  • After one month of exercise, the participants who practiced t’ai chi experienced significant reductions in their systolic blood pressure, heart rate, triglycerides, total cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol.
  • At the end of the intervention period, the t’ai chi group experienced substantial decreases in their BMI, heart rate, systolic blood pressure, diastolic blood pressure, pulse pressure, triglycerides, total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, and blood sugar levels. Practicing t’ai chi also improved their quality of life.

 

Lemongrass essential oil protects the liver from acetaminophen-induced injury

State University of Maringa (Brazil)

A study published in The American Journal of Chinese Medicine found that the essential oil extracted from lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus) can protect the liver from damage caused by acetaminophen intake. 

  • They pretreated mice with 125, 250, or 500 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) of lemongrass essential oil or 200 mg/kg of a standard drug per day for seven days.
  • Then, they induced liver toxicity by administering 250 mg/kg dose of acetaminophen.
  • The researchers found that pretreatment with lemongrass essential oil significantly reduced the levels of liver disease markers alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphatase (ALP).
  • Inflammation in the liver was also reduced by lemongrass essential oil.
  • Liver lesions in mice were also improved after pretreatment with lemongrass essential oil.
  • Pretreatment with lemongrass essential oil increased antioxidant activity in the liver.
The Gary Null Show - 05.24.22

The Gary Null Show - 05.24.22

May 24, 2022

Want to escape Alzheimer’s disease? Run for your life and exercise

Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center (Israel), May 20, 2022



Exercise slows down aging of the brain and can reduce risks of Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias by about half.





 Long-term epidemiological and physical studies show that exercise can improve memory, concentration and mood and minimize pain, as well as reduce the risk of cognitive damage, stroke, Parkinson’s disease and depression.


“These findings flew in the face of the belief that over the age of 30, the neurons decline irreversibly. Today we know that the adult brain has many stem cells that when stimulated can differentiate and turn into ripe neurons that know how to create synapses.” The neurologist added that for some unknown reason, the best potential for differentiation exists in brain regions responsible for memory.


Exercise promotes the secretion of trophic factors — including brain-derived neurotrophic factor that encourage the growth of stem cells that turn into adult nerve cells. he added. These factors activate genes responsible for the development of stem cells in the hippocampus and other brain regions involved in memory, storage and processing of data. They are available in large quantities during a baby’s first years when the brain develops at a rapid pace, but the amounts decline during adolescence and aging.


It was best to do aerobic exercise (causing the heart and lungs to exert themselves) along with non-aerobic exercise (strengthening the muscles on the skeleton) at least three times a week. Even if you exercise just as an adult and the cognitive decline has begun, your physical activity will slow down the rate of decline.


Orange juice is good for ageing brain: Study

University of Reading (UK) May 19, 2022

Drinking orange juice could help improve brain function in elderly people, says a new study.

The study saw a group of 37 healthy adults (mean age 67 years) consuming 500 ml of orange juice daily over an eight week period. At the beginning and end of the eight weeks their memory, reaction time and verbal fluency was measured. 

This study is thought to be one of the first to show that regularly consuming orange juice flavanones could have a positive effect on older people’s cognition. 

“This is an important discovery which strengthens the growing body of evidence that flavonoid rich foodstuffs could play a big role in tackling cognition decline in old age,” he concluded. 

Oil Pulling For Maintaining Oral Hygiene – Review

Yenepoya University and Dental College (India), May 22, 202

Oil pulling is an ancient ayurvedic therapy for maintaining oral hygiene. Oils for oil pulling are easily available in household. Oil pulling is mentioned in the ayurvedic text Charak Samhita and Sushruta Samhita as ‘Kavala Graha’ or ‘Kavala Gandoosha’.  In Gandoosha the mouth is completely filled with oil such that gargling is impossible whereas in Kavala Graha comfortable lesser quantities of oil is used such that gargling is possible.

In oil pulling, a tablespoon full of oil is swished around the mouth in the early morning before breakfast and in empty stomach for about 20 min. In case of children greater than five years of age, a teaspoon of oil is used. The oil is ‘pulled’ and forced in between all the teeth by swishing it all around the mouth. At the end of this activity if the procedure is done correctly, the viscous oil will become milky white and thinner. Then it is spit out and mouth is thoroughly washed with clean warm saline water or tap water and teeth are cleaned with fingers or routine tooth brushing is performed.9 If the jaw aches, then the procedure can be done just for 5–10 min. The oil should not be spit into the sink as the oil can cause clogging of the pipes. Instead, the oil should be spit into a trashcan or on a paper towel.

Oil pulling should be ideally performed daily morning on empty stomach before brushing teeth and care should be taken that oil is not swallowed. Swallowing of oil during oil pulling should be avoided as the oil contains bacteria and toxins. Oil pulling is best practiced in sitting position with chin up. It can be practiced thrice daily in empty stomach before meals to fasten the healing effects. It is contraindicated for children below 5 years due to risk of aspiration. The practitioner should take care not to aspirate the oil while performing rigorous oil pulling. In cases of oral ulcers, fever, vomiting tendency, asthma and in conditions where brushing is difficult and sometimes contraindicated, oil pulling can be advantageously used to maintain oral hygiene.

Organic oils such as sunflower oil, sesame oil, and coconut oil are of benefit especially if it is cold pressed, though refined oil also works in “pulling” the bacteria, viruses and protozoa from the oral cavity. Since trans fats are absent in cold pressed oils when compared to commercial oils which are extracted from strong petroleum based solvents; oil pulling is ideally performed with cold pressed oils.

Oil pulling generates antioxidants which damage the cell wall of microorganisms and kill them. These oils will attract the lipid layer of bacterial cell membranes, and cause it to stick or get attracted, and pulled to the oil. During oil pulling, the oil gets emulsified and surface area of the oil gets increased.

Paracetamol (Tyenol) in pregnancy may lower testosterone in unborn boys

University of Edinburgh, May 20th, 2022

Prolonged paracetamol use by pregnant women may reduce testosterone production in unborn baby boys, research has found.

Researchers say their findings could help to explain reported links between paracetamol use in pregnancy and reproductive health problems in young boys.

The University of Edinburgh study tested the effect of paracetamol on testosterone production in mice that carried grafts of human testicular tissue. These grafts have been shown to mimic how the developing testes grow and function during pregnancy.

Scientists gave the mice a typical daily dose of paracetamol – over a period of either 24 hours or seven days. They measured the amount of testosterone produced by the human tissue an hour after the final dose of paracetamol.

They found there was no effect on testosterone production following 24 hours of paracetamol treatment. After seven days of exposure, however, the amount of testosterone was reduced by 45 per cent.

Natural plant chemicals in licorice root could help fight tooth decay, study shows

University of Edinburgh (Scotland), May 20, 2022

Oral care products containing a natural chemical that stops bacteria harming teeth could help prevent decay, a study suggests.

The plant natural product acts against harmful mouth bacteria and could improve oral health by helping to prevent the build-up of plaque, researchers say.

The compound – known as trans-chalcone – is related to chemicals found in liquorice root. The study shows that it blocks the action of a key enzyme that allows the bacteria to thrive in oral cavities.

Researchers found that blocking the activity of the enzyme prevents bacteria forming a protective biological layer – known as a biofilm – around themselves. Plaque is formed when bacteria attach themselves to teeth and construct biofilms. Preventing the assembly of these protective layers would help stop bacteria forming plaque, the teams says.

Another Practice That Helps Gut Disease: Yoga, Meditation and Prayer, Says Study

Benson-Henry Institute at Massachusetts General Hospital, May 19, 2022 

A pilot study has found that participating in a nine-week training program including elicitation of the relaxation response (mind body stress reduction techniques such as yoga, meditation and prayer) had a significant impact on clinical symptoms of the gastrointestinal disorders irritable bowel syndrome and inflammatory bowel disease and on the expression of genes related to inflammation and the body’s response to stress. These practices actually have a tangible effect on genes!

 The report  is the first to study the use of the relaxation response in these disorders and the first to investigate the genomic effects of the relaxation response in individuals with any disorder.

The current study was designed both to investigate whether a relaxation-response-based intervention could improve the quality of life in patients with IBS or IBD and to analyze the intervention’s effects on inflammatory markers and gene expression. The study enrolled 48 adult participants – 19 of whom had been diagnosed with IBS and 29 diagnosed with IBD – who participated in a nine-week group program focused on stress reduction, cognitive skills and health-enhancing behaviors. Each of the weekly sessions included relaxation response training, and participants were asked to practice relaxation response elicitation at home for 15 to 20 minutes each day. Along with aspects featured in other group programs offered at the Benson-Henry Institute, this program included a session specifically focused on gastrointestinal health.

Both in patients with IBS and those with IBD, participation in the mind/body program appeared to have significantly improved disease-related symptoms, anxiety and overall quality of life, not only at the end of the study period but also three weeks later. While there were no significant changes in inflammatory markers for either group of participants, changes in expression were observed in almost 200 genes among participants with IBS and more than 1,000 genes in those with IBD. Many of the genes with altered expression are known to contribute to pathways involved with stress response and inflammation.

Videos:

1. ELDERLY SUICIDE – This is Agenda 21 – MUST SEE! (0:31)
2. She’s exposing the truth at Davos | Redacted with Natali and Clayton Morris (18:23)
3. The Coddling of the American Mind moderated by Malcolm Gladwell (first 12:00) 
4. The World Hoax Plandemic Treaty
5. Senate blocks $48 billion aid package for the US, but sends 40 billion to Ukraine

The Gary Null Show - 05.23.22

The Gary Null Show - 05.23.22

May 23, 2022

Could probiotics restore microbiome imbalance linked to autoimmune disorder?

UCLA and Oslo University
Probiotics might help restore gut bacterial imbalance in patients with systemic sclerosis, says a new study looking at gastrointestinal bacterial compositions in two geographically-distinct populations suffering from the autoimmune disorder.
Systemic sclerosis is an autoimmune disease which impacts the body’s connective tissue. It is an uncommon condition that results in hard, thickened areas of skin and sometimes problems with internal organs and blood vessels.The study ran across the US and Norway and found that Norwegians and Americans with systemic sclerosis had higher levels of bacteria which can cause inflammation and lower levels of bacteria which are said to protect against inflammation compared to those not suffering from systemic sclerosis.The study found that those with systemic sclerosis had significantly lower levels of gut bacteria which is thought to protect against inflammation, such as Bacteroides.They were also found to have higher amounts of bacteria which promote inflammation, such as Fusobacterium, in comparison to those without systemic sclerosis.The study suggests that probiotics may aid restoring gut bacterial balance in those suffering from systemic sclerosis.
 

Caraway extract shows slimming potential for women

University of Malaya (Malaysia), 

An aqueous extract of caraway seeds may suppress appetite and help slim waistlines and thighs in physically active women, says a new study.

Data published in Phytotherapy Research indicated that 90 days of supplementation with the caraway (Carum carvi L.) extract led to significant reductions in waist circumference of 6.2 cm and thigh circumference of 5.4 cm, compared to baseline levels. No significant waist reductions were recorded in the placebo group.

“This study showed that the consumption of 30 mL/day CAE [caraway aqueous extract] may result in reasonable anti-obesity effects,” wrote the researchers. “Most likely, this occurs through a combination of four major bioactivities, including anti-microbial, anti-oxidant, and anti-inflammatory properties, together with the appetite-suppressing activity.

Scientists from the University of Malaya (Malaysia), Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences (Iran), and Natural Products Inc (USA) recruited 70 aerobically trained, overweight, and obese women to participate in their triple-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical study. The women – who were instructed to not change their diet or physical activity – were randomly assigned to receive either the caraway extract or placebo for 90 days.

Results showed that women in the caraway group had significant reductions in both appetite levels and carbohydrate intake compared with the placebo group.

Commenting on the potential bioactives compounds responsible for the effects, the researchers note that caraway seed extracts contain volatile compounds such as limonene, gamma-terpinene, trans-carveol, carvone, thymol, and carvacrol.

Friends Provide Better Pain Relief Than Morphine, Oxford University Study Reveals

Oxford University

Recent studies have explored the science behind friendships and discovered that there are actually measurable differences between people who have strong, healthy social networks and those who don’t. In particular, people with strong friend connections were found to experience significantly better states of physical and mental health.

“People with social support have fewer cardiovascular problems and immune problems, and lower levels of cortisol — a stress hormone,” says Tasha R. Howe, PhD, associate professor of psychology at Humboldt State University.

Adding to the growing research on the benefits of friendship, a recent study conducted by researchers at Oxford University established that people with more friends have higher pain tolerance. 

The study was designed to use pain tolerance to test the brain’s endorphin activity. The researchers theorised that people with larger social networks would, as a result, have higher pain tolerance. The findings of the study supported their theory in that it showed that indeed, strong social connections were correlated with higher pain tolerance.

As mentioned in the final statement it is not just the size of our social network that is important to our wellbeing, but the quality of the friendships that matters as well. With the advent of the internet modern society is changing quickly, and our interactions are increasingly occurring online. Even though the internet can be a great way to connect with likeminded people, online friends just aren’t the same as those we can actually sit with and look directly in the eye when we communicate–and a digital hug is just nowhere near as good as a real one! 

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5. SHOCKING! Assad Spills Truth About Ukraine Conflict and NATO by Richard Medhurst (11:50)

The Gary Null Show - 05.20.22

The Gary Null Show - 05.20.22

May 20, 2022

Blueberries can lower the risk of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women with high blood pressure

Colorado State University, May 19 2022

Consuming blueberries can lower the risk of cardiovascular disease in postmenopausal women with high blood pressure, according to new research by Colorado State University faculty member Sarah Ardanuy Johnson.

Consumption of 22 grams of freeze dried blueberry powder (equivalent to about 1 cup of fresh blueberries) mixed with water taken daily for 12 weeks improved the function of the inner lining of blood vessels (called the endothelium), according to preliminary findings of a study.

They performed a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-arm clinical trial in 43 estrogen-deficient postmenopausal women aged 45-65 years with elevated blood pressure or stage 1-hypertension. Johnson’s research team used freeze-dried blueberries to retain the polyphenols as much as possible, and to allow for the study to be double-blind, meaning that neither the investigators nor the study participants knew whether they were getting the treatment (blueberry) or placebo. 

Johnson said the team observed increases in blood metabolites that are products of metabolism of anthocyanins (polyphenols found in blueberries that give them their blue color) and metabolism of polyphenols by the gut microbiome. 

Diet plays key role in ADHD symptoms in children

Ohio State University, May 20, 2022

Here’s a good reason for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) to eat their fruits and vegetables: It may help reduce inattention issues, a new study suggests.

Results showed that kids who consumed more fruits and vegetables showed less severe symptoms of inattention, said Irene Hatsu, associate professor of human nutrition at The Ohio State University.

The study that evaluated the effectiveness of the supplement showed that children who took the micronutrients were three times as likely to show significant improvement in their ADHD and emotional dysregulation symptoms than those who took a placebo. 

Higher dose of melatonin improved sleep in older adults

Harvard University, May 19, 2022

In a small study of healthy adults aged 55 and older, 5 mg of melatonin increased total sleep time compared to a placebo.

Researchers conducted the study in 24 healthy, older adults to evaluate whether a high-doseor a low-dose melatonin supplement could improve sleep. The team found that the higher dose had a significant impact, increasing total sleep time compared to placebo by more than 15 minutes for nighttime sleep and by half an hour for daytime sleep. Results are published in the Journal of Pineal Research

The body naturally produces the hormone melatonin, which helps regulate a person’s sleep-wake cycle with night and day. Melatonin levels peak at night. But among older people, levels of the hormone are often lower.

The team found that the low dose of melatonin did not lead to a statistically significant change in overall sleep time and that the changes that were seen were when sleep was scheduled during the biological day. Participants taking the 5 mg dose had a significant increase in total sleep time and sleep efficiency regardless of whether sleep was scheduled during the day or night.

Sound Waves Boost Older Adult’s Memory, Deep Sleep

Northwestern University, May 14, 2022

Gentle sound stimulation—such as the rush of a waterfall—synchronized to the rhythm of brain waves significantly enhanced deep sleep in older adults and improved their ability to recall words. This is according to a Northwestern Medicine study.

Deep sleep is critical for memory consolidation. But beginning in middle age, deep sleep decreases substantially, which scientists believe contributes to memory loss in aging.

The sound stimulation significantly enhanced deep sleep in participants and their scores on a memory test.

The degree of slow wave sleep enhancement was related to the degree of memory improvement, suggesting slow wave sleep remains important for memory, even in old age.

Mulberry extract may ‘activate’ brown fat, help treat obesity

Chinese Academy of Sciences, May 9, 2022

Researchers from the Chinese Academy of Sciences say obesity can be treated by using a natural compound in mulberries that “activates” brown fat.The compound, known as rutin, was found to have weight loss properties in a study published in The FASEB Journal. Researchers say this may not only be able to help treat obesity, but related diseases associated with excessive weight gain.”The beneficial effects of rutin on BAT-mediated metabolic improvement have evoked a substantial interest in the potential treatment for obesity and its related diseases, such as diabetes,” researcher Wan-Zhu Jin said in a press release. During the experiment, supplemental rutin was added to the drinking water of both groups. Researchers observed improved glucose homeostasis in both cohorts. The investigators concluded the rutin improved metabolic functions in the mice. Scientists are confident similar remedies can be used to treat obesity in humans.

Psychedelic drugs promote neural plasticity in rats and flies

University of California Davis, May 12, 2022 

Psychedelic drugs may have mind-altering powers in the physical sense, too. A new study, published in the journal Cell Reports, found psychedelics, specifically DOI, DMT, and LSD, can change brain cells in rats and flies, making neurons more likely to branch out and connect with one another. The work supports the theory that psychedelics could help to fight depression, anxiety, addiction, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

“These are some of the most powerful compounds known to affect brain function, it’s very obvious to me that we should understand how they work,” says senior author David E. Olson, assistant professor at the University of California, Davis.

The idea that depression stems from imbalanced brain chemistry remains popular, but recent studies have revealed evidence that depression manifests as structural changes in brain circuits or atrophy in parts of the brain. This doesn’t mean neurons die off during depression, but that neurites retract. Neurites are the sections—either axons or dendrites—of a neuron that project out to bridge the gap between two neurons at the synapse to facilitate communication.

“One of the hallmarks of depression is that the neurites in the prefrontal cortex—a key brain region that regulates emotion, mood, and anxiety—those neurites tend to shrivel up,” says Olson. These brain changes also appear in cases of anxiety, addiction, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

In their paper, Olson and colleagues tested psychedelics and showed some psychedelics tested, including LSD, proved to be more potent and efficacious in promoting neurite growth.

Videos :

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2. Preparing for 𝒕𝒉𝒆 𝑭𝒖𝒕𝒖𝒓𝒆 OFF-GRID…BY Chris Hampton of Wolf Clan Media (30:00)
3. The Great Reset | Dystopian Sci-Fi Short Film – By : Zachary Denman (3:57)
4. Bertrand Russell – Message To Future Generations (1959)
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The Gary Null Show - 05.19.22

The Gary Null Show - 05.19.22

May 19, 2022
Videos Played Today: 
 
 
 
(interview with Douglas Kruger conducted by David Ansara of The Centre For Risk Analysis (CRA)
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